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    #11

    not a teacher

    Never heard "settee" before.

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    #12

    Re: English and American

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    After thinking about it, I have realised that I probably do use movie and apartment occasionally, too. I also use settee, but less often than the other two.

    In South Africa we also used to say settee much more often than couch/sofa.
    But that was quite some time ago...

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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      • Retired English Teacher
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    #13

    Re: English and American

    Quote Originally Posted by suikerbossie View Post
    In South Africa we also used to say settee much more often than couch/sofa.
    But that was quite some time ago...
    Well, I am not quite as young as I used to be.

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    #14

    Re: English and American

    I am a 61 year-old American English speaker.
    The bold words are the ones I hear or say most commonly, except where noted.

    apartment (always) - flat
    Baggage - luggage
    biscuit - cookie (different items in AmE)
    couch - sofa (interchangeable, usually couch)
    elevator (always)- lift
    autumn - fall (interchangeable)
    mail (always)- post
    pants (always)-trousers
    reserve - book
    lorry (never)- track (always truck)
    hoover - vacuum cleaner (always)
    shop - store
    shedule - timetable (interchangeable)
    shorts - briefs (shorts are short pants; briefs are underpants)
    line (always)- queue
    movie - film
    chips (always)- crisps
    railway - railroad
    undergroun - subway (always)

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    #15

    Re: English and American

    I remember reading once how interesting it is that in England the Royal Mail delivers the post and in America the Post Office delivers the mail.

    Regarding "fall" and "autumn"--fall is the word you're going to hear in casual conversation. Someone will say "I've booked a trip to Hawaii this fall". If you were writing a news article about seasonal rainfall, OTOH, you might well say "autumn", or a Macy's brochure about seasonal fashion might say "autumn".

    Fall and autumn are an example of what people say about American English preserving some usages. IIRC "fall" was used in England to describe the season up until the middle of the 19th century or so.

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    #16

    Re: English and American

    apartment - flat flat
    Baggage - luggage luggage
    biscuit - cookie biscuit
    couch - sofa (both)
    elevator - lift lift
    autumn - fall autumn
    mail - post mail
    pants -trousers pants (mostly) trousers (sometimes)
    reserve - book book (mostly) reserve (sometimes)
    lorry - truck truck
    hoover - vacuum cleaner vacuum
    shop - store shop
    schedule - timetable timetable (mostly) schedule (sometimes)
    shorts - briefs shorts
    line - queue (both)
    movie - film film (mostly) movie (sometimes)
    chips - crisps ..usually say potato chips for "crisp" type, and chips for "fish & chips" type.
    railway - railroad railway
    underground - subway subway

    New Zealander, also lived in UK, Europe and Australia.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #17

    Re: English and American

    I concur largely with JMurray.
    shorts - briefs: Shorts are short pants, briefs are undies.
    movie - film: Mainly movie.

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    #18

    Re: English and American

    apartment - flat (75%)
    Baggage - luggage (100%)
    biscuit - cookie (almost 100%)
    couch - sofa (90%)
    elevator - lift (not sure, probably 50/50)
    autumn - fall (100%)
    mail - post (100%)
    pants -trousers (depends on who I talking to)
    reserve - book (100%)
    lorry - track (truck 100%)
    hoover - vacuum cleaner (80%)
    shop - store (60%)
    shedule - timetable (70%)
    shorts - briefs (100%, didn't know the other word)
    line - queue (70%, depends on who I'm talking to)
    movie - film (50/50)
    chips - crisps (95%)
    railway - railroad (80%)
    underground - subway (not sure, depends on who I'm talking to)

    Poland, some time spent in both the UK and the US.

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