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Thread: Nor do I

  1. #1
    GUEST2008 is offline Key Member
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    Default Nor do I

    Hi

    One person says: I don't mind.
    The other one replies: Nor/Neither do I. (is it a correct answer?)

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Nor do I

    Use either.

    (I don't mean 'use either'; use either 'nor' or 'neither'.)

    Rover

  3. #3
    TheParser is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: Nor do I

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hi

    One person says: I don't mind.
    The other one replies: Nor/Neither do I. (is it a correct answer?)

    Thanks


    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Guest,


    Teacher Rover has already answered your question.

    (1) May I just elaborate a bit?

    (2) I, too, had the same question a few weeks ago, and

    found something in Kristin Blanpain's Academic Writing

    in the Humanities (Google Books):

    (a) Only neither may be preceded by a conjunction:

    Tom: I don't like mushrooms.

    Martha: Nor do I./ Neither do I. And neither do I.

    ***

    Susan: X is not a saint.

    Ralph: Nor is he a devil./ Neither is he a devil./ But neither is he

    a devil.

    ***

    The author of that book reminds us that in compound sentences,

    neither is always preceded by a conjunction:

    Many young people are not reading newspapers, and neither

    are many older people reading newspapers.

    I do not wish him good luck, but neither do I wish him bad luck.

    NOTE: All the example sentences were only my ideas. They were

    not Kristin Blanpain's.


    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    P.S. I think that you may not put a conjunction in front of nor because

    nor is a conjunction. English does not accept two conjunctions together.

    On the other hand, some dictionaries tell us that neither can often

    be analyzed as an adverb. Therefore, it can be preceded by a

    conjunction.
    Last edited by TheParser; 27-Jan-2011 at 23:41.

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