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Thread: help

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    #1

    help

    Is it correct to say "I have got a terrible time"
    Thank you

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: help

    Quote Originally Posted by ecoto View Post
    Is it correct to say "I have got a terrible time"
    No.

    I have a terrible time (when I visit my mother-in-law)
    I am having a terrible time (at present).


    You can use 'have got' only when it denotes some idea of possession:

    I have (got) a new car.

  2. Khosro's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: help

    I learn English and at the same time I teach English.
    --------------------------------------------------

    You can use 'have got' only when it denotes some idea of possession:

    Fivejedjon is right. You can not use "have got" here. But "Have got" is not only for "Some idea of possession".
    Last edited by Khosro; 28-Jan-2011 at 12:42.

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    #4

    Re: help

    Quote Originally Posted by Khosro View Post
    But "Have got" is not only for "Some idea of possession".
    Can you give some examples, please?

  4. Khosro's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: help

    I learn English and at the same time teach English.
    ------------------------------------------------
    -- She's got her hair tied up in a bun today.
    -- He'd got the book open in front of him.
    (For showing how something is placed or arranged).

    But also: "You've got to show your passport" (If we are allowed to place "have to" under the heading "have").

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: help

    Quote Originally Posted by Khosro View Post
    1. -- She's got her hair tied up in a bun today.
    2. -- He'd got the book open in front of him.
    (For showing how something is placed or arranged).

    But also: 3. "You've got to show your passport" (If we are allowed to place "have to" under the heading "have").
    When I read sentences #1 and #2, I understand why you were unhappy with my "You can use 'have got' only when it denotes some idea of possession". However, I still feel that these situations are covered by 'some idea of possession', a wording I chose deliberately for its vagueness. If I had been writing a chapter, rather than a brief post, I would have expanded my answer.

    #3 is different. I, and many writers on grammar, consider the verb have (got) to to be a distinct verb that has nothing to do with have in modern English.

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    #7

    Re: help

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    When I read sentences #1 and #2, I understand why you were unhappy with my "You can use 'have got' only when it denotes some idea of possession". However, I still feel that these situations are covered by 'some idea of possession', a wording I chose deliberately for its vagueness. If I had been writing a chapter, rather than a brief post, I would have expanded my answer.

    #3 is different. I, and many writers on grammar, consider the verb have (got) to to be a distinct verb that has nothing to do with have in modern English.
    I can't see why "got" is necessary (or indeed desirable) in #1 and #2 "She has her hair tied up...", "He has the book open in front of him".

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    #8

    Re: help

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I can't see why "got" is necessary (or indeed desirable) in #1 and #2 "She has her hair tied up...", "He has the book open in front of him".
    I agree, but I have to admit that some people would say it.

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    #9

    Re: help

    I learn English and at the same time I teach English.
    --------------------------------------------------

    you are right Fivejedjon. Even in those 2 examples I wrote there is a "she" and and "he" and not just "how something is placed or arranged".

    thank you

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