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Thread: In future

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    #1

    In future

    Shouldn't it be "in the future"?

    "It could well be that the Court of Justice will in future admit exceptions to this rule insofar as benefits intended to facilitate access to the labour market are concerned."

    Thanks!

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    #2

    Re: In future

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    "It could well be that the Court of Justice will, in the future, admit exceptions to this rule, insofar as benefits intended to facilitate access to the labour market are concerned."
    Not sure I understand your reply. The sentence I provided was not written by me. Do you agree that "in future" is wrong?

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    #3

    Re: In future

    In the US, we certainly would say "in the future" but I can't confirm that it's universally used that way.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. probus's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: In future

    In Canada "in the future" is far more common than "in future", but the latter is sometimes heard, especially when someone is being reprimanded.

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    #5

    Re: In future

    In future is just fine by me.

    Rover

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    #6

    Re: In future

    So there you go: In future is okay in the UK, and In the future is okay in the US, and both may be used in Canada. We need Ray to tell us the Aussie version.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: In future

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    In Canada "in the future" is far more common than "in future", but the latter is sometimes heard, especially when someone is being reprimanded.
    I think what probus said about "reprimand" might be important in this case. Perhaps it's not just about being British or american.

    In the future: "check if the computer can be upgraded in the future"

    And

    In (the) future: "In future, ask before you borrow my clothes"

    (both from Macmillan advanced learners dictionary)

    the second one means something like "from now on" but the first one doesn't. But even for the second sentence Macmillan put "the" in the prantheses.

    If in your sentence "in future" is intended to mean "from now on" then you don't need to change it for "in the future".

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    #8

    Re: In future

    Quote Originally Posted by Khosro View Post
    ]If in your sentence "in future" is intended to mean "from now on" then you don't need to change it for "in the future".
    You do in the US.

    We don't use "in future" at all, not for a reprimand, not for a general statement, not in a box, not with a fox.

    (The latter is a reference to the book Green Eggs and Ham.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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