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  1. #1
    iamtime is offline Member
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    Default I cannot age with you

    Hi,

    I want to say, 'you have passed away when we were young together once. You have gone to heaven maybe but I now have aged and you have missed all the years I have passed', can I say in this way below, in a shorter sentence?

    I cannot age with you, you have forgone my years

    Does it make any sense to you? or this one below is better?

    I cannot age with you, you have forgone my time

    Thanks,
    Lau
    Last edited by iamtime; 16-Feb-2011 at 16:37.

  2. #2
    Coolfootluke is offline Member
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    Default Re: I cannot age with you

    I am not a teacher.

    That is excellent poetry, both versions, but I suspect you think that to forgo means to leave before, when it does not. Forgive me if I'm wrong about that. I really love the line, though.

  3. #3
    iamtime is offline Member
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    Default Re: I cannot age with you

    Thank you, Coolfootluke. Glad you liked it!

    Yes I am trying to apply 'you have left before me' and 'have missed all the joy and sorrow in the years I have passed'. But this is too long and too much details, thought to shorten into something more abstract - 'my years'...

    Thanks.

  4. #4
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: I cannot age with you

    "Forego" could be what you're looking for. Do you mean that the person missed all your lifetime? Or do you mean just a part of it? From your lines I would infer that the person had already passed away when you were born. This may be just my personal feeling though.

  5. #5
    iamtime is offline Member
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    Default Re: I cannot age with you

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    "Forego" could be what you're looking for. Do you mean that the person missed all your lifetime? Or do you mean just a part of it? From your lines I would infer that the person had already passed away when you were born. This may be just my personal feeling though.
    Thanks for the reply Birdeen, I would say it is 'just a part of it' of my lifetime. it meant to say we had been young together once and then you have missed the rest of it...

    But after all, whether it is that 'the person missed all your lifetime' or 'just a part of it' - it doesn't matter, I am trying to make it as abstract as possible so that anyone can associate with it from their own experiences...

    Thank you
    Last edited by iamtime; 16-Feb-2011 at 17:34.

  6. #6
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: I cannot age with you

    I see. I'm not sure if I made the first sentence of my post noticeable enough. Do you know the difference between "forego" and "forgo"?

  7. #7
    iamtime is offline Member
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    Default Re: I cannot age with you

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I see. I'm not sure if I made the first sentence of my post noticeable enough. Do you know the difference between "forego" and "forgo"?
    I think they are the same according to this website Definition of forego verb from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus

    where forego is for formal use but forgo isn't...

  8. #8
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: I cannot age with you

    This dictionary notes only one meaning of the word "forego". There are more. Please compare: forgo - definition of forgo by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia. and forego - definition of forego by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    Note that "forego" may mean precede, while "forgo" doesn't mean that. I'm saying this because I think this is the meaning you want.

  9. #9
    iamtime is offline Member
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    Default Re: I cannot age with you

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    This dictionary notes only one meaning of the word "forego". There are more. Please compare: forgo - definition of forgo by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia. and forego - definition of forego by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    Note that "forego" may mean precede, while "forgo" doesn't mean that. I'm saying this because I think this is the meaning you want.
    Thank you, Birdeen. Yes I think I should use 'forego' according to the dictionary on this website!

    Thanks so much!

  10. #10
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: I cannot age with you

    You're welcome.

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