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  1. mas94010
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    #1

    word order: frequency words

    1.Are these correct?
    *Often Mr. Johnson dictates reports to his secretary.
    *Are you ready for breakfast usually by eight o'clock?
    *They always have tried to follow his instructions very carefully.

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    #2
    *Often Mr. Johnson dictates reports to his secretary. YES
    *Are you usually ready for breakfast by eight o'clock?
    *They have always tried to follow his instructions very carefully.

    The last two sound better like this to me.

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #3
    Adverbs of Frequency: Adverbs of frequency are placed before the main verb (not the auxiliary verb).

    For example: He often goes to bed late. Do you sometimes get up early?

    http://esl.about.com/cs/intermediate/f/f_adverbs.htm

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    #4
    There is some flexibility with some adverbs of frequency, but the position Ron suggests is always right.

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #5
    • "How often" adverbs expressing the frequency of an action are usually placed before the main verb but after auxiliary verbs (such as be, have, may, must):

      I often eat vegetarian food. (before the main verb)
      He never drinks milk. (before the main verb)
      You must always fasten your seat belt. (after the auxiliary must)
      She is never sea-sick.(after the auxiliary is)
      I have never forgotten my first kiss. (after the auxiliary have and before the main verb forgotten)

      Some other "how often" adverbs express the exact number of times an action happens and are usually placed at the end of the sentence:

      This magazine is published monthly.

      He visits his mother once a week.
      When a frequency adverb is placed at the end of a sentence it is much stronger.

      Compare:

      She regularly visits France.
      She visits France regularly.

      Adverbs that can be used in these two positions:

      frequently,
      generally,
      normally,
      occasionally,
      often,
      regularly,
      sometimes,
      usually
      http://www.edufind.com/english/grammar/ADVERBS5.cfm

  4. sanny
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    #6
    But can you also say:
    Sometimes I go to the park.
    or
    I go to the park sometimes.

    I think there is a little different between these sentences, but I can't exactly tell what.
    If both of the sentences are correct can you do the same thing then with:
    frequently,
    generally,
    normally,
    occasionally,
    often,
    regularly,
    sometimes,
    usually

  5. RonBee's Avatar
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by sanny
    But can you also say:
    Sometimes I go to the park.
    or
    I go to the park sometimes.

    I think there is a little different between these sentences, but I can't exactly tell what.
    If both of the sentences are correct can you do the same thing then with:
    frequently,
    generally,
    normally,
    occasionally,
    often,
    regularly,
    sometimes,
    usually
    I think you mean to say there is a little difference between those sentences. However, absent context I don't see any.

    You are right. There is a lot of variation possible in the placement of frequency adverbs.

    :)

  6. sanny
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    #8
    okay: :D

  7. claude
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    #9
    er, I still have some questions:
    a) I still/aslo have seen someone use another programming tool.
    b) I have still/also seen someone use another programming tool.

    The word 'still' or 'also' is not an adverb expressing the frequency, can I still follow teacher RonBee's summary, place it before the main verb but after auxiliary verbs? then the 'a' expression is incorrect, isn't it?

    Thanks.

  8. RonBee's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: word order: frequency words

    Quote Originally Posted by claude
    er, I still have some questions:
    a) I still/aslo have seen someone use another programming tool.
    b) I have still/also seen someone use another programming tool.

    The word 'still' or 'also' is not an adverb expressing the frequency, can I still follow teacher RonBee's summary, place it before the main verb but after auxiliary verbs? then the 'a' expression is incorrect, isn't it?

    Thanks.
    First of all, the words still and also definitely do not mean the same thing. The sentence I still have some questions means I have some additional questions or I have some questions that remain unanswered. If we substitute also for still in that sentence we get I also have some questions, which means I have some questions in addition to those asked by the other person (or persons). That is quite a different sentence.

    As for the question about also, in my view you could place it before or after have (as in the examples), but not after seen. (What the sentence means is not certain. That would depend on context. (There are a couple of possibilities.)) I doubt that you could use still in either sentence, thought I suppose it might be possible.

    Last edited by RonBee; 02-Dec-2004 at 23:45. Reason: To correct spelling

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