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  1. #1
    jaycoop93 is offline Newbie
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    Default Anyone here Good at Correcting Grammar?

    If someone could help me today, within the next couple hours It would be greatly appreciated!

    Like that title says... anyone here good at grammar? Like correcting and such I would love it if someone could help me out.

    I'm even thinking about paying someone via PayPal ($1-??) to help me with my paper that I recently typed up if they could fix any grammatical errors.

    So please reply here I will be online for the most part.

    (My friends referred me to this forum)

    I am currently studying abroad at the United States in Michigan. Which is why I need some help.

    Please do not think I cannot pay due to my post ranking.

    Thank You!

    Essay:

    In William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” we experienced and truly understood the meaning of horror in this ghastly gothic story. The “Rose”, Emily was an image that displayed life, and beauty. But soon the rose is unable to keep its glow, becoming all faded and withered the pedals falls one by one. Emily’s inability to accept or to acknowledge death was something she could not let go; soon she would fade into insanity, and live a withered lonely life, with love which is bound to her even till death does her in.

    At the beginning of Faulkner’s story, immediately we realize that this story is a gloomy story “When Miss Emily Grierson died, our whole town went to her funeral” (90). Emily’s overprotective father had a huge part in the story, and because of that it led to Emily’s loneliness and her distorted growth as a person. Even in death, Mr. Grierson’s presence was ominous and controlling, which influenced throughout Emily’s life, believed, “None of the good men were quite good enough for Miss Emily” (92). Although, her father had driven away all the men that wished to enter her life, it was all crushed and destroyed by her father, “Being left alone, and a pauper, she had become humanized” (93).

    Days passed by till her father’s death was being mourned upon. The decay of the body, set adrift a horrid smell which uncannily drew suspicion towards the Grierson’s household. The townspeople brought this upon the Judge to judicate this matter. The Judge believed it to be something that the servant of Griersons had killed a “snake or a rat” (92), which developed the horrid stench. More complaints followed through that day, the townspeople asking to get rid of the smell. Yet, all were too afraid to tell that to the women’s face, reasonably four men “sprinkled lime” (92) to eradicate the smell. “After a week or two the smell went away” (92) but others realized that the father has been declared dead, but Miss Emily believed that the father was still alive, she could not let go, someone who cherished and protected her.

    Miss Emily became very dark. She secluded herself from everyone else and even with Homer Barron. The townspeople even began calling her “Poor Emily” (93), due to the circumstances that she had to endure. Her selfish beliefs blackened everything and anything that she believed and she only sought death as a remedy. Since all good that was once in her life is now gone (mom and dad), Emily saw nothing she had no reason to look back at anything or any decisions that were made on her part. Homer Barron death was near. Emily went to the poison shop, looking for something to kill rats “I want the best you have.” (94), soon realized by the townspeople they began to gossip again and believed that Miss Emily was to “kill herself” (94).

    When people observed a very positive relationship between Homer and Emily they all stated, "she [has] fallen"(93). They weren't even the least bit surprised when Emily went to the local druggist to get some poison (arsenic) to kill some "rats", they just assumed that she was tired of living in sin, and that she got the poison to kill herself, once that conclusion was reached, the people went about their normal lives and decided suicide would be the best thing Emily could do under her circumstances. Since Emily had no intention of killing herself some of the townspeople began to say that her lifestyle was a “disgrace to the town and a bad example to the young people” (94) of the town. They were so outraged at this display of immoral behavior that, the wife of the towns Baptist minister wrote “Emily’s relations in Alabama” (94) about her behavior.

    People watched the development of Emily's life with her cousins, after awhile gossip spread about town again, and they were "sure" (94) that Emily and Homer had gotten married, because “Miss Emily had been at the [local] jeweler's and ordered a man's toilet set in silver, with the letters H. B. on each piece” (94). Townspeople began to ponder as to what going on. “Two days later she bought a complete outfit of men's clothing, including a nightshirt” (94). The townspeople were happy about this and ran the cousins off. Sure enough, within three days after the cousins were gone “Homer Barron was back in town” (95). A neighbor of Emily's saw her manservant let Homer through the kitchen door at dusk one evening, “and that was the last the town saw of Homer” (95).

    Miss Emily wasn't seen or heard from for “six or seven years” (95). The next time Miss Emily is heard from her hair has turned gray with the onset of age. She kept herself busy for about seven years giving “china-painting” (95) lessons. Sometime during her sixties, after seven years of painting lessons, Miss Emily “door remained closed” (95) for good and was never publicly seen again.

    Many years later, Miss Emily died at the age of “seventy four” (95) with “vigorous iron-gray, like hair of an active man” (95). The entire town attended her funeral but for very different reasons. “The men attended out of simple respectful affection for the fallen monument” (90), and the women so they could satisfy their “curiosity to see the inside of [Miss Emily's] house” (90) shunned. The house is open to the public and the men go to the upstairs room, which to the town’s knowledge had not been opened or “seen in [over] forty years, and which would have to be forced” (96). Once the door was broken down to the shock of the townspeople they found the body of Emily lover Homer decayed to a skeleton, they also noticed a second pillow with an “indentation of a head” (96) and they saw on the pillow a “long strand of iron-gray hair” (96).

    My personal opinion is that Emily picked Homer to replace the only man who loved her. When her father died she wanted the body. If she would have been able to keep the body there would be no doubt that when she died the body in the bed would have been the body of her father. Also he not only has some of the same qualities of her father such as they are both occupied in controlling roles but also he is a northerner in a southern town and he is a traveler and often leaves town unnoticed so if she killed him during the night who would know and even yet who would care, in this horrific ghastly tale.

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Anyone here Good at Correcting Grammar?

    Corrections, suggestions in blue.

    Quote Originally Posted by jaycoop93 View Post


    In William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” we experienced and truly understood the meaning of horror in this ghastly gothic story. The “Rose”, Emily was an image that displayed life, and beauty. But soon the rose is unable to keep its glow, becoming all faded and withered the pedals falls one by one. Emily’s inability to accept or to acknowledge death was something she could not let go; soon she would fade into insanity, and live a withered lonely life, with love which is bound to her even till death does her in.
    In William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” we experienced and truly understood the meaning of horror in this ghastly Gothic story. The “Rose”, Emily was an image that displayed life and beauty. But soon the rose was unable to keep its glow, becoming faded and withered, the petals falling one by one. Emily’s inability to accept or to acknowledge death was something she could not let go. Soon she would spiral into insanity. she wound up living a lonely, withered life, with love bound to her until she died.


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