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  1. #1
    Kotfor is offline Member
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    Default will as a lexical verb

    I'd like to know about will as a lexical verb. What kind of infinitive do we use with it? Is it a bare infinitive or not?

    Example with to

    1) A man can achieve what he wills to achieve.

    Example without to

    2) Does he will it stop growing?

    Which one is correct as for the use of infinitive after will?

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: will as a lexical verb

    Use the "to."

  3. #3
    Kotfor is offline Member
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    Default Re: will as a lexical verb

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Use the "to."
    Why is that I come across many people say it without to? Is it just a careless speaking?

  4. #4
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: will as a lexical verb

    Keep in mind the verb "will" and the helping verb "will" are not the exact same thing.

    "You will eat what I made for dinner." versus "You have the will to achieve."

  5. #5
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    Default Re: will as a lexical verb

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    1) A man can achieve what he wills to achieve.

    2) Does he will it stop growing?

    Which one is correct as for the use of infinitive after will?
    The first is not the lexical verb 'will'; it is the modal, and the -s ending is incorrect.

    We can say only: A man can achieve what he will (achieve).

    In the second, we have the lexical verb 'will' meaning 'to use the power of your mind to cause something to happen'. You have used it correctly, assuming that you are speaking, for example, of someone who has caused a cancerous growth to spread no more.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: will as a lexical verb

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Keep in mind the verb "will" and the helping verb "will" are not the exact same thing.

    "You will eat what I made for dinner." versus "You have the will to achieve."
    In your second example, 'will' is a noun.

  7. #7
    Kotfor is offline Member
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    Default Re: will as a lexical verb

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    The first is not the lexical verb 'will'; it is the modal, and the -s ending is incorrect.

    We can say only: A man can achieve what he will (achieve).


    It is intersting that you see it that way. I have found a few examples backing up "wills to". Let me know how you find them.

    1) God is said to be omnipotent only because he can do all things that he wills to do.
    2) Whether he wills to smoke or wills not to smoke.
    3) A man wills because he wills to will, and he wills to will because he wills to will to will, and so forth; but this is absurd.

    I wonder why can't the first example (which you didn't aprove) have WILLS?

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    In the second, we have the lexical verb 'will' meaning 'to use the power of your mind to cause something to happen'. You have used it correctly, assuming that you are speaking, for example, of someone who has caused a cancerous growth to spread no more.
    So shall I use it always with to or is it optional?

  8. #8
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: will as a lexical verb

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    In your second example, 'will' is a noun.
    Doh! I'll leave it to you to continue on this subject.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: will as a lexical verb

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Doh! I'll leave it to you to continue on this subject.
    Hey, Dave - if you are going to slip up, at least enjoy the fact that you've done it in style. All I have managed recently is to say, in another thread, that a defining clause was non-defining.

  10. #10
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: will as a lexical verb

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    It is interesting that you see it that way. I have found a few examples backing up "wills to". Let me know how you find them.

    1) God is said to be omnipotent only because he can do all things that he wills to do.
    2) Whether he wills to smoke or wills not to smoke.
    3) A man wills because he wills to will, and he wills to will because he wills to will to will, and so forth; but this is absurd.
    Where did you find these examples? They all sound very unnatural to me.

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