Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    konungursvia's Avatar
    konungursvia is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,785
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Discussion about relationship between culture and language

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The Irish language is interesting; the way to say hello/good morning etc when meeting someone is "Dia dhuit", which means literally "God (be) with you", the response to which is " Dia is Mhuire dhuit" [God and Mary (be) with you]. I don't know how much their use influences a person's thinking butt he language hasn't developed any other way to greet somebody.
    Similarly, in Quebec French, the only swear words are religious in nature:

    Tabernac!
    Hostie!
    Calisse!

    Quebeckers sometimes offer the counter-point that English swear words relate to the body and sex.

  2. #12
    freezeframe is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2,113
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Discussion about relationship between culture and language

    The answer to that question would depend on what we mean by "language" there. If we take language in the widest possible meaning of symbols, including language of images and such, sure. If we talk about words chosen to label certain things and concepts and how that circumscribes possible interpretations and way of thinking about those things and concepts, yes. If you are talking about linguistic structures... I don't know much about that. I guess it also depends on your theoretical/political/disciplinary allegiances which would determine how the question is framed and why. The question determines the answer.*

    *OMG is this about language?!



  3. #13
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,099
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Discussion about relationship between culture and language

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Similarly, in Quebec French, the only swear words are religious in nature:

    Tabernac!
    Hostie!
    Calisse!
    Some Italian swearwords come to mind, but I don't think it would be a good idea to quote them. Suffice to say, they're good at bestemmiare.

  4. #14
    Opus018 is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • France
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Discussion about relationship between culture and language

    Well, I speak Spanish, French, and English. I grew up speaking Spanish and English. Everytime i speak from one language to another, my voice change. It's really overwhelming to change from one culture to another, When i speak English, i speak the language of the United States, i grew up to speak English with confidence. I grew up speaking Spanish from my family in Puerto Rico, and i was tough to speak with pride. When i decided to take French as my third language, i spoke French with sincerity. It's amazing to see how languages evolve but i don't agree with the sub categorization of a language to a specific culture. For example in France, The French make a difference between the English spoken in Great Britain and the English in the US, which i perfectly understand but If i were to say that i am from the US, most of the time they will respond saying (in French) "Alors tu parles Américain'' " so you speak American''. I say, no i speak English because i don't believe that the way i speak makes a factor, inwhich i wont be understood in England or Australia. It doesn't matter whether you are coming from the U.S, Australia, or South Africa , English should not broken in to different cultures because that is what makes the language so powerful, that it was gone fare. If you are American, you speak English, if you are South African, you speak English. The same goes with the other languages like French, If you are Québécois, you speak French and just as good as a Parisian. As a linguistic student, i am against this sub categorization just because the culture and language just evolved. I honest find it ludicrous

  5. #15
    konungursvia's Avatar
    konungursvia is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,785
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Discussion about relationship between culture and language

    I think the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis is as good as Freud; by which I mean I am very respectful but don't think it's correct by modern standards.

    Learning German grammar doesn't make you philosophical or musical; learning French grammar doesn't teach your brain architecture or math; learning English doesn't make you good at business or colonialism. Language does not have a strong, direct impact on thought or culture. Sapir-Whorf is wrong.

    But if you study any of these at length, to the point of fluency (requiring years of practice and social interaction) you will be exposed to the culture in question, and it will change you, and make you grow. Sapir-Whorf is right again.

    Most important of all, if you grow up knowing only one culture, and then learn another, something in your mind grows, and not by a factor of two or three, or the number of languages you know, but tenfold, a thousandfold. You lose the rigidity you started out with, and see the world more as it is.

    The frog that lives in a well will never know the sea.

  6. #16
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,749
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Discussion about relationship between culture and language

    I like the comparison of Sapir-Worf and Freud- it seems very apt.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Aug-2010, 22:53
  2. culture vs. language?
    By eltserver in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24-Dec-2006, 14:54
  3. my proposal: please add the discussion of CULTURE
    By japanjapan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Jun-2005, 12:42
  4. Relationship between thought and language
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 14-Apr-2004, 23:45

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •