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    #1

    "go abroad (a ship)" and "go on board (a ship)"

    Definition and pronunciation of aboard | Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary
    We went aboard.
    He was already aboard the plane.
    The plane crashed, killing all 157 passengers aboard.

    Definition and pronunciation of board | Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary
    Have the passengers gone on board yet?

    Do "go aboard (a ship)" and "go on board (a ship)" mean exactly the same meaning?
    Last edited by sunsunmoon; 05-Mar-2011 at 15:51.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "go abroad (a ship)" and "go on board (a ship)"

    Quote Originally Posted by sunsunmoon View Post
    Do "go abroad (a ship)" and "go on board (a ship)" mean exactly the same meaning?
    Yes

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    #3

    Re: "go abroad (a ship)" and "go on board (a ship)"

    Thank you, fivejedjon. I've just corrected my typo.

    - get on a ship/train/plane
    - get aboard a ship/train/plane
    - get on board a ship/train/plane
    These mean the same thing, though the first phrase is more common than the others, don't they?

  2. probus's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "go abroad (a ship)" and "go on board (a ship)"

    I think you are correct that get on is the commonest form.

    In your second case go aboard can substitute for get aboard.

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    #5

    Re: "go abroad (a ship)" and "go on board (a ship)"

    You also simple "board."

    Your flight is now boarding.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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