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Thread: walks the ramp

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    #1

    Question walks the ramp

    1.That model walks on the ramp.
    2.That model walks the ramp.

    Why in the second sentence 'on' is not used?

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    #2

    Re: walks the ramp

    In what context did you see these sentences?

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    #3

    Re: walks the ramp

    It is idiomatic. "Walking the ramp" means being a clothing model at a live show in the same way that "treading the boards" means acting on stage in a theater.

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    #4

    Re: walks the ramp

    I am not a teacher.

    The first "walk" is intransitive, and the second is transitive. A models walks the catwalk, runway or ramp, she does not walk on it.

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    #5

    Re: walks the ramp

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    In what context did you see these sentences?

    I read it in a newspaper.

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    #6

    Re: walks the ramp

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner View Post
    It is idiomatic. "Walking the ramp" means being a clothing model at a live show in the same way that "treading the boards" means acting on stage in a theater.

    If it is an idiom then why can't I find it any book of idioms like this can be found -'tread the boards'.

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    #7

    Re: walks the ramp

    Quote Originally Posted by Coolfootluke View Post
    I am not a teacher.

    The first "walk" is intransitive, and the second is transitive. A models walks the catwalk, runway or ramp, she does not walk on it.
    k but even if the second one is transitive then how can anyone walk something like catwalk, runway or ramp.

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    #8

    Re: walks the ramp

    Quote Originally Posted by payal desai View Post
    k but even if the second one is transitive then how can anyone walk something like catwalk, runway or ramp.
    I don't think it is transitive, any more than 'run' in the slightly different 'run a mile'.

    However, whether or not it is transitive, the idiomatic expression is used as mykwyner explained in post #3.

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    #9

    Re: walks the ramp

    Quote Originally Posted by payal desai View Post
    k but even if the second one is transitive then how can anyone walk something like catwalk, runway or ramp.
    I am not a teacher.

    Of course it is transitive. It has an object: ramp. You could look in a dictionary, too. It is not idiom, it is a straightforward definition of the word. "Tread the boards" is an expression meaning "act in a play", "to walk the floor" is to fret, but we can run a race, walk the streets, climb every mountain, ford every stream---there is nothing odd here.

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    #10

    Re: walks the ramp

    Quote Originally Posted by Coolfootluke View Post
    Of course it is transitive. It has an object: ramp.
    To a learner there is no question of 'of course' it is transitive. There is are qualitative differences between building a ramp, walking the dog and walking the ramp.
    You could look in a dictionary, too.
    My COD gives 8 intransitive uses of walk and one transitive, covering: - cause to walk with one, accompany in walking, ride or lead an animal, take charge of a puppy at walk. So, no help in the dictionary there.
    It is not idiom, it is a straightforward definition of the word.
    Well it's not definition, and it is not particularly straightforward to a learner meeting it for the first time.
    "Tread the boards" is an expression meaning "act in a play", "to walk the floor" is to fret,That is a new one on me. but we can run a race, walk the streets, climb every mountain, ford every stream---there is nothing odd here.
    There's nothing odd to you, but many people reading this are learners. When they have probably learnt that 'run' and 'walk' are intransitive then they may well wonder if some words are ellipted in 'run a race' (in), run a mile (for), walk the boards (on).

    If we claim that 'of course' certain things are true, or that things that appear strange to them are not at all odd, then we are not helping build their confidence.

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