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Thread: walks the ramp

  1. #11
    Coolfootluke is offline Member
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    Default Re: walks the ramp

    I am not a teacher.

    I apologize to payal desai if I seemed harsh. As penance, I will try to explain more fully.

    There are two kinds of verb: transitive and intransitive. A transitive verb takes an object. In "the dog ate the bone", "bone" is the object of the verb "ate". An intransitive verb has no object. In "the dog ate", "ate" has no object. Not only do we not know what the dog ate, we do not care. All we want to say is that the dog consumed food.

    The same verb can be either transitive and intransitive, depending on what you mean, like "to eat" above, but many verbs are always either one or the other. "To die" is intransitive (you cannot die anything). "To recognize" is transitive (you cannot simply recognize, you have to recognize something).

    "Walk" is normally intransitive. We can walk "around" (adverb). We can walk "to the corner" (adverbial phrase). We can simply walk (or not, if we have broken our leg).

    The "walk" you see in "walk the ramp" is transitive. There are many definitions of "walk" under the transitive rubric. We can walk the dog. We can walk a friend home. We can walk a batter in baseball. These are active---we make the object walk. But we can also walk the streets. This is somewhat different. It is we who are doing the walking.

    You can think of it like there is a word missing: walk [upon] the ramp, walk [upon] the battlements. But there is no word missing, you just have to adjust your idea of the verb "to walk" to include this definition, which is plain English. It is no more strange than "run the mile" or "swim the Channel" or "go the distance" or "jump the fence".
    Last edited by Coolfootluke; 07-Mar-2011 at 16:08. Reason: mixed up thee two

  2. #12
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: walks the ramp

    Quote Originally Posted by Coolfootluke View Post
    I apologize to payal desai if I seemed harsh. As penance, I will try to explain more fully.
    And I apologise to you for the aggressive tone of my post. I must learn to count to ten before posting.

    I don't completely accept your views on transitive verbs, but that is irrelevant to this post, so I shall say no more.

    payal desai, as far as your original question is concerned, Coolfootluke's words are helpful:

    'You can think of it like there is a word missing: walk [upon] the ramp, walk [upon] the battlements. But there is no word missing, you just have to adjust your idea of the verb "to walk" to include this definition, which is plain English. It is no more strange than "run the mile" or "swim the Channel" or "go the distance" or "jump the fence".

  3. #13
    payal desai is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: walks the ramp

    Quote Originally Posted by Coolfootluke View Post
    I am not a teacher.

    I apologize to payal desai if I seemed harsh. As penance, I will try to explain more fully.

    There are two kinds of verb: transitive and intransitive. A transitive verb takes an object. In "the dog ate the bone", "bone" is the object of the verb "ate". An intransitive verb has no object. In "the dog ate", "ate" has no object. Not only do we not know what the dog ate, we do not care. All we want to say is that the dog consumed food.

    The same verb can be either transitive and intransitive, depending on what you mean, like "to eat" above, but many verbs are always either one or the other. "To die" is intransitive (you cannot die anything). "To recognize" is intransitive (you cannot simply recognize, you have to recognize something).

    "Walk" is normally intransitive. We can walk "around" (adverb). We can walk "to the corner" (adverbial phrase). We can simply walk (or not, if we have broken our leg).

    The "walk" you see in "walk the ramp" is transitive. There are many definitions of "walk" under the transitive rubric. We can walk the dog. We can walk a friend home. We can walk a batter in baseball. These are active---we make the object walk. But we can also walk the streets. This is somewhat different. It is we who are doing the walking.

    You can think of it like there is a word missing: walk [upon] the ramp, walk [upon] the battlements. But there is no word missing, you just have to adjust your idea of the verb "to walk" to include this definition, which is plain English. It is no more strange than "run the mile" or "swim the Channel" or "go the distance" or "jump the fence".



    It didn't seem harsh to me and your views now helped me clearly understand the concept.
    Lots of thanks to you and fivejedjon.

  4. #14
    payal desai is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: walks the ramp

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    And I apologise to you for the aggressive tone of my post. I must learn to count to ten before posting.

    I don't completely accept your views on transitive verbs, but that is irrelevant to this post, so I shall say no more.

    payal desai, as far as your original question is concerned, Coolfootluke's words are helpful:

    'You can think of it like there is a word missing: walk [upon] the ramp, walk [upon] the battlements. But there is no word missing, you just have to adjust your idea of the verb "to walk" to include this definition, which is plain English. It is no more strange than "run the mile" or "swim the Channel" or "go the distance" or "jump the fence".


    Yes coolfootluke's words are helpful to me and I got the concept now.

    Thanks a lot.

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