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  1. #1
    eager is offline Newbie
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    go through+something+adjective

    A few days ago, I was going through my new sailing gear ready for my first long trip, around the coast of Britain on the sailing ship Hirta.

    In this sentence the construction is: go through + something + adjective

    In accordance to this I may say:I was going through my garden free of garbage or
    I was going through my room clean for making a party.

    Are these two sentence above mentioned correct? If not why? Or this construction is only vehicles related?!

    When it comes to the English grammar I always want to have some resources to refer to.Can this be found in any grammar book?



  2. #2
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    Re: go through+something+adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by eager View Post
    A few days ago, I was going through my new sailing gear ready for my first long trip, around the coast of Britain on the sailing ship Hirta.

    In this sentence the construction is: go through + something + adjective

    In accordance to this I may say:I was going through my garden free of garbage or
    I was going through my room clean for making a party.

    Are these two sentence above mentioned correct? If not why? Or this construction is only vehicles related?!

    When it comes to the English grammar I always want to have some resources to refer to.Can this be found in any grammar book?


    No, your sentences are wrong. I think this is because your index sentence is wrong. Where did it come from?
    " ... I was going through my new sailing gear, getting ready for my first long trip ..." makes sense.

  3. #3
    eager is offline Newbie
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    Re: go through+something+adjective

    I am immensely glad that they are wrong as well as the index sentence.I've assumed that there is some incorrectness about that.

    It comes from some kind of cpe exam preparation test at flo-joe.co.uk site.

  4. #4
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    Re: go through+something+adjective

    I suppose the sentence is just about possible in informal conversation, when the speaker omits the 'getting'. I was playing with ideas, and I thought I might possibly say, "I was looking for my passport yesterday ready for my trip to America" = "I was looking for my passport so that I would be ready...".

    I most certainly recommend learners not to use this, but you may hear it and, as eager has shown, even see it in print.

  5. #5
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    Re: go through+something+adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I suppose the sentence is just about possible in informal conversation, when the speaker omits the 'getting'. I was playing with ideas, and I thought I might possibly say, "I was looking for my passport yesterday ready for my trip to America" = "I was looking for my passport so that I would be ready...".

    I most certainly recommend learners not to use this, but you may hear it and, as eager has shown, even see it in print.
    Yes, I thought the original might be just possible elsewhere (not in AusE), but the derived sentences are obviously wrong, so the construction can't be used as a template even if some people do say it.

  6. #6
    Jaskin is offline Senior Member
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    Re: go through+something+adjective

    hi,
    Please note I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker;

    I reckon I'm going to put myself through a lot of trouble.
    What about the following sentences ?

    [..] you're buying a complete telescope package ready for action right out of the box.

    [..]all the materials, including the preassembled plumbing systems and precut lumber, were delivered to the site ready for construction.

    Shocked, Alicia and her companions wheeled, weapons ready for attack or defense.

    Not far away, the mighty Ottoman army was deployed with its modern weapons ready for battle.

    If I got it right going through means To examine or scrutinize (a number or series of things), especially in a regular order. and sailing gear refers to kind of clothing; sailing clothing.

    I thought it could be a problem with dangling modifier but on the other hand it doesn't really matter what/who is ready for the trip.

    In my opinion adding getting changes slightly the meaning of the sentence.
    In the sentence: I was going through my new sailing gear, getting ready for my first long trip We don't know at what stage of the preparation process the author is.
    Whereas "I was going through my new sailing gear ready for my first long trip" suggests that everything is prepared, apart from the "sailing gear".

    Cheers;

  7. #7
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    Re: go through+something+adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    hi,
    Please note I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker;
    Some native speakers would say that; others would prefer:
    "I am neither a teacher nor a native speaker."
    "I am not a teacher or a native speaker."
    "I am not ateacher, nor am I a native speaker."

    I think that your first few examples are different from the one we were discussing.

    [..] you're buying a complete telescope package ready for action right out of the box.
    That can be read as an ellipted:" [...] a complete telescope which is ready for action".

    [..]all the materials, including the preassembled plumbing systems and precut lumber, were delivered to the site ready for construction.
    I think we often use adjective phrases in this way:
    "I bought the car half-assembled."
    "He arrived at the conference unable to put his recent loss out of his mind."

    Shocked, Alicia and her companions wheeled, weapons ready for attack or defense.
    Not far away, the mighty Ottoman army was deployed with its modern weapons ready for battle.
    These are also common patterns.

    If I got it right going through means To examine or scrutinize (a number or series of things), especially in a regular order. and sailing gear refers to kind of clothing; sailing clothing.
    Probably, but it might include such things as his log book, compass, GPS, etc.

    I thought it could be a problem with dangling modifier but on the other hand it doesn't really matter what/who is ready for the trip.
    It has to be either the speaker or his gear, in my opinion.

    In my opinion adding getting changes slightly the meaning of the sentence.
    In the sentence: I was going through my new sailing gear, getting ready for my first long trip We don't know at what stage of the preparation process the author is.
    Whereas "I was going through my new sailing gear ready for my first long trip" suggests that everything is prepared, apart from the "sailing gear".
    Possibly, though most of us feel this is not a natural sentence. If it is possible, then you are probably correct.
    5

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