Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    SanMar's Avatar
    SanMar is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    554
    Post Thanks / Like

    struck / stricken & always struck ??

    Hi
    Could someone please clarify for me the use of struck and stricken? I've looked it up in the dictionary and under verb / inflection it states, struck also stricken, so does this mean it can be used interchangeably?
    For instance

    I was struck-stricken with guilt after having stolen your pen.

    I was struck with a sense of relief when you forgave me.

    ( to me this second sentence would seem odd with stricken but I am not sure why, I've only used/heard stricken to express something negative or burden like, but now I am not sure if this is always the case)

    also

    It always struck me as odd that you eat pizza for breakfast.

    ( is had missing from this sentence? i read the first half of the sentence in a news article -- i know its common in spoken English in N.America but is it acceptable in written or formal English? )


    thanks so much!

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: struck / stricken & always struck ??

    It seems to me, a speaker of BrE, that stricken is mainly used adjectivally, especially in compounds:

    As the flood-waters receded, the stricken village slowly came back to life.
    The grief-stricken parents ...


    It always struck me as odd that you eat pizza for breakfast.

    ( is had missing from this sentence?)
    In the right context, a past perfect is possible. Without more context it is impossible to say if it is essential.
    Last edited by 5jj; 14-Mar-2011 at 05:51. Reason: typo

  3. #3
    SanMar's Avatar
    SanMar is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    554
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: struck / stricken & always struck ??

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    It seems to me, a speaker of BrE, that stricken is mainly used adjectivally, especially in compunds:

    As the flood-waters receded, the stricken village slowly came back to life.
    The grief-stricken parents ...


    In the right context, a past perfect is possible. Without more context it is impossible to say if it is essential.

    Would it be correct to say,

    I was stricken with a sense of panic when I realized what had happened.

    (I'm not sure, but I thought struck/ stricken in the above examples are past participles ... and maybe this belongs on a different thread but ... Can you use past participles without the auxiliary/helping verb?



    thanks


    sorry I meant to write has or had in the previous post ....It has/had always struck me ...
    Last edited by SanMar; 14-Mar-2011 at 05:51. Reason: forgot info

  4. #4
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: struck / stricken & always struck ??

    Quote Originally Posted by SanMar View Post
    Would it be correct to say,

    I was stricken with a sense of panic when I realized what had happened.

    Yes
    - you can also 'say struck by...'

    ( I thought struck/stricken in the above examples are past participles.
    Past participles can often be use as adjectives. It is often difficult to say whether such a word should be labelled as a passive form or BE+adjective in such sentences as 'I was bored'. Sometimes, a preposition will make this clear:

    'I was bored by his speech.' - passive
    'I was bored with his speech.' - adjective

    This is important only if you have a an obsession with labelling.

    For the past participle of 'strike' it appears to me that most speakers of BrE use 'struck', but many speakers of AmE use 'stricken'.

    I, personally, would say:

    'I was stricken with grief.' - adjective
    'I was struck by guilt.' - passive.

    For active perfect forms, especially when 'strike' means that an idea has occurred to me, I would use only 'struck': 'It has often struck me that...'
    5

  5. #5
    SanMar's Avatar
    SanMar is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    554
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: struck / stricken & always struck ??

    Thanks for your explanation!

    and sorry if I'm asking something that has already been answered and I have yet to get it, but, with respect to....

    It always struck me as odd that.... you eat pizza for breakfast.


    Is this the simple past then? I thought this was a present or past perfect tense but that the helping verb had been omitted or forgotten.

    This sentence is just sounding stranger and stranger the more I think about it.


  6. #6
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: struck / stricken & always struck ??

    Quote Originally Posted by SanMar View Post
    It always struck me as odd that.... you eat pizza for breakfast.
    It's the past simple. I would probably use a present perfect; with a past simple I'd be more likely to say, "It always struck me as odd that you ate ...", but the sentence you quote is possible.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] struck off
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-Sep-2010, 08:21
  2. Struck a blow
    By musicgold in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 25-Aug-2009, 08:38
  3. came across/struck as
    By angliholic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Oct-2007, 13:33
  4. struck by
    By KLPNO in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 21-Oct-2007, 08:09
  5. seemed struck
    By mhmircea in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-May-2007, 18:21

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •