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  1. #11
    davilan is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: American and British English differences


  2. #12
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: American and British English differences

    Quote Originally Posted by davilan View Post
    "This is not a generally accepted statement. It has its supporters, but many people consider AmE and BrE dialects of the same language"

    by the way-are any of those people on the American side of the pond?
    From Wikipedia:

    British and American English, spoken by close political and military allies, are almost universally regarded as dialects of a single language
    Not the most reliable source for such statements, but it's true what they say.

  3. #13
    davilan is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: American and British English differences

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    They differ and they have the same roots, that's indisputable. The problem is the definitions of language and dialect. Some say that to be a distinct language, a dialect must become incomprehensible enough to other speakers. Most dialects of BrE and AmE are almost perfectly mutually intelligible, so, if we accept mutual intelligibility as the main criterion, we end up with two dialects, not two languages.

    There are many other criteria and depending on which we choose to use we will get different classifications. For example, BrE and AmE are spoken in different states, have their standardized (to some extent) forms that differ from each other, and are prestigious enough, which could indicate that they're actually different languages.

    It's all about definitions.
    You sound American-if so, have you EVER been in the UK!

    "a dialect must become incomprehensible enough to other speakers"

    Thank you for making my case! UK English that is not on the BBC news is incomprehensible to me.

    Welsh English even more so

  4. #14
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: American and British English differences

    Quote Originally Posted by davilan View Post
    You sound American-if so, have you EVER been in the UK!
    I've been to both the UK and the US.

  5. #15
    davilan is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: American and British English differences

    I just noticed that you are not a native English speaker-just wanted to note that from what you've written here I wouldn't know.

    If I'd met many UK speakers that sounded like you-I might buy that American is an English dialect. It has it's own language rules, grammar and sentence structure, spelling etc. and there are now more non British English words in an American dictionary as British English words. That is a language.

  6. #16
    AlexAD's Avatar
    AlexAD is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: American and British English differences

    May I just ask why is it important to learn one or another English dialect? (or whatever they call that) Why not choose a neutral approach? I can hardly believe that two men who speak different English dialects won't understand each other. May be they'll be confused with some details but this is not a surprise for me because this is about all languages.

  7. #17
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: American and British English differences

    Quote Originally Posted by davilan View Post
    I just noticed that you are not a native English speaker-just wanted to note that from what you've written here I wouldn't know.
    -- I do agree with you here. BC is most proficient!

    Quote Originally Posted by davilan View Post
    It has it's own language rules, grammar and sentence structure, spelling etc. and there are now more non British English words in an American dictionary as British English words. That is a language.
    I agree that we spell several words differently, but not at all that we have a different sentence structure and certainly not that there are more "non British word" (by this I assume words that would not be in a dictionary used in England) than "British words).

    That's crazy. I know the 100 most commonly spoken words are identical in both dialect and I'm willing to bet that the vast majority of the nex 200 are as well - spelling aside.

    Simply becaue one calls something a truck and the other calls it a lorry makes them no more different than three parts of the US where one thing is called a spigot in one place and tap in another and a facucet in the third.

    I can't understand why you would want to devote 250 pages to teaching the differences when they are 98% the same. (My estimate - but I surely don't believe it's less than 95%.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  8. #18
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    bagzi94 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: American and British English differences

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    May I just ask why is it important to learn one or another English dialect?
    Because I don't want to mix two languages.
    And I think most of the people speak AE.

  9. #19
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    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: American and British English differences

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    -- I do agree with you here. BC is most proficient!



    I agree that we spell several words differently, but not at all that we have a different sentence structure and certainly not that there are more "non British word" (by this I assume words that would not be in a dictionary used in England) than "British words).

    That's crazy. I know the 100 most commonly spoken words are identical in both dialect and I'm willing to bet that the vast majority of the nex 200 are as well - spelling aside.

    Simply becaue one calls something a truck and the other calls it a lorry makes them no more different than three parts of the US where one thing is called a spigot in one place and tap in another and a facucet in the third.

    I can't understand why you would want to devote 250 pages to teaching the differences when they are 98% the same. (My estimate - but I surely don't believe it's less than 95%.)
    I agree, American English is no more different from standard BrE than Irish English or Scots English, or even some English English dialects.

  10. #20
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    nyota is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: American and British English differences

    Quote Originally Posted by bagzi94 View Post
    Because I don't want to mix two languages.
    And I think most of the people speak AE.
    Most people speak Chinese.

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