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  1. #1
    Karima-19's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Language Learning Strategies:)

    Hello!

    L2 learners of English need to plan their learning by selecting and providing a learning strategy in order to enhance, facilitate, and improve a faster learning. I would like to ask learners who have already used some types of Language learning Strategies, to provide me with the one they find it more effecient and affective to assure easier and faster learning. Since there are a lot of types of strategies available in FLL/SLA.

    Thanks in advance

    Karima

  2. #2
    Route21's Avatar
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    Default Re: Language Learning Strategies:)

    Hi Karima

    I'm afraid, as I'm not an English teacher, I can't help you in your specific problem. I'm currently trying to learn Thai, which is (supposedly!) a phonetic language (which should make it easier) but it has the added difficulty of being a "tonal" (high, medium, low, rising and falling tones) language.

    I have not come across the strategies available in "FLL/SLA(?)".

    Could you please advise what the acronyms stand for or, better still, provide a link to appropriate websites.

    Many thanks
    R21

  3. #3
    Karima-19's Avatar
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    Default Re: Language Learning Strategies:)

    Do you mean Strategies of learning Thai....

    I'm sorry, I don't understand what are you asking for exactly?

    Perhaps I can help...

    Karima
    Last edited by Karima-19; 29-Mar-2011 at 18:01.

  4. #4
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: Language Learning Strategies:)

    Quote Originally Posted by Route21 View Post
    Could you please advise what the acronyms stand for...
    Could be Foreign Language Learning and Second Language Acquisition.

  5. #5
    Karima-19's Avatar
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    Default Re: Language Learning Strategies:)

    I think any language learner can benefit from Learning Language Strategies to learn any foreign language! Please check this link, it might help you.

    Lessard-Clouston - Language Learning Strategies: An Overview for L2 Teachers (TESL/TEFL)



  6. #6
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    Default Re: Language Learning Strategies:)

    It's difficult to single out the most effective strategy because people differ in how they learn. If you depend on vision rather than your ear you might prefer to see the text rather than hear it. This is obviously a very simple example and probably the most common one but it does its job. What makes learning effective is using *various* strategies that suit your personal characteristics. What works for me, doesn't have to work for others. The strategies I choose (consciously or not) may change over time and to be honest I find it difficult to track them all!

    When I was much younger I was crazy about graphic representation. I can easily recall a picture of a kitchen that I was given to learn vocabulary. I was to colour it and sign the objects I could see - spoons on the left, forks in the drawer, pans, pots, plates, a socket, and a spider hanging from the ceiling.

    Using action to 'show' words was also helpful, so all kinds of guessing games where somebody would jump, run, crawl (particularly nice with verbs) etc. were most welcome.

    Later I also did some semantic and syntactic grouping (categories, topics and word families – verbs, nouns etc.). The latter helped me learn affixes as well as spelling! beautiful beautifully. It made me dedicate a couple of pages to my favourite mistakes, too e.g. *suprise instead of surprise, *tomorow instead of tomorrow, *obssesion instead of obsession, ocassion instead of occasion etc.

    Cards with words were also very helpful in my case. I cut up a piece of paper into small squares and put a Polish word on one side and a corresponding English word on the other together with an exemplary sentence. This worked great as I was focusing on one word at a time and I could test myself. However, this method is rather time-consuming, so you can't always make use of it, but you can be picky about what you put on such cards.

    Now, they've made me think of revising. Vital. Revise – 5 min. break, revise – 10 min. break, revise 1h break, hours, days, weeks etc. You have to be persistent with this one and make sure your will doesn't grow fat and lazy . Tough.

    I learnt English alphabet in the form of a song (not the one most English children learn though) and I swear until very recently I couldn't say it any other way but with the melody ringing in my head. If I tried to do it without it, I was getting lost somewhere around H. Embarrassing.

    Speaking of which, embarrassment is a very effective memory strategy. I remember how I was once chatting with a friend and I wanted to tease him about a spelling mistake he made, so I went '*how embarassing!'. At least he had a laugh. I can assure you I haven't made that mistake since.

    When I can't remember the pronunciation of a given word I sometimes look for a similar sounding word in my native language [e.g. I'd associate vulture with walczę (I fight)]. And when I struggled to pronounce Mediterranean (eh, I still have to check how to spell it), I found a weather forecast and repeated it a number of times after the model. Then, I was trying to retrieve the correct pronunciation whenever I could, for example walking down the street.

    What else, dun dun dun. Oh! I've learnt a lot just singing songs – the pronunciation of single words, copying the rhythm, connected speech, accent, it's quite nice if you're into singing in the first place. *And* if people around you are understanding enough.

    I couldn't forget about reading in English; it has helped me immensely. It just brings your focus to collocations, everyday language (depending on what you read), vivid phrases, new vocabulary, synonyms. Reading labels on products can teach you a lot, too. Generally speaking, resourcing (using target language reference materials) works wonders.
    Actually, I find using this forum very helpful. When reading native speakers' posts, not only do I pay attention to what they write, but also how they write it. Not because I expect it to be uber-correct but because it has this natural flow to it. And of course you get to learn new phrases, my most recent one is 'in flux'.


    Phew, my collection of thoughts ends here for now. It really IS a broad subject.
    Last edited by nyota; 30-Mar-2011 at 00:32.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Language Learning Strategies:)

    Quote Originally Posted by nyota View Post
    It's difficult to single out the most effective strategy because people differ in how they learn. If you depend on vision rather than your ear you might prefer to see the text rather than hear it. This is obviously a very simple example and probably the most common one but it does its job. What makes learning effective is using *various* strategies that suit your personal characteristics. What works for me, doesn't have to work for others. The strategies I choose (consciously or not) may change over time and to be honest I find it difficult to track them all!

    When I was much younger I was crazy about graphic representation. I can easily recall a picture of a kitchen that I was given to learn vocabulary. I was to colour it and sign the objects I could see - spoons on the left, forks in the drawer, pans, pots, plates, a socket, and a spider hanging from the ceiling.

    Using action to 'show' words was also helpful, so all kinds of guessing games where somebody would jump, run, crawl (particularly nice with verbs) etc. were most welcome.

    Later I also did some semantic and syntactic grouping (categories, topics and word families verbs, nouns etc.). The latter helped me learn affixes as well as spelling! beautiful beautifully. It made me dedicate a couple of pages to my favourite mistakes, too e.g. *suprise instead of surprise, *tomorow instead of tomorrow, *obssesion instead of obsession, ocassion instead of occasion etc.

    Cards with words were also very helpful in my case. I cut up a piece of paper into small squares and put a Polish word on one side and a corresponding English word on the other together with an exemplary sentence. This worked great as I was focusing on one word at a time and I could test myself. However, this method is rather time-consuming, so you can't always make use of it, but you can be picky about what you put on such cards.

    Now, they've made me think of revising. Vital. Revise 5 min. break, revise 10 min. break, revise 1h break, hours, days, weeks etc. You have to be persistent with this one and make sure your will doesn't grow fat and lazy . Tough.

    I learnt English alphabet in the form of a song (not the one most English children learn though) and I swear until very recently I couldn't say it any other way but with the melody ringing in my head. If I tried to do it without it, I was getting lost somewhere around H. Embarrassing.

    Speaking of which, embarrassment is a very effective memory strategy. I remember how I was once chatting with a friend and I wanted to tease him about a spelling mistake he made, so I went '*how embarassing!'. At least he had a laugh. I can assure you I haven't made that mistake since.

    When I can't remember the pronunciation of a given word I sometimes look for a similar sounding word in my native language [e.g. I'd associate vulture with walczę (I fight)]. And when I struggled to pronounce Mediterranean (eh, I still have to check how to spell it), I found a weather forecast and repeated it a number of times after the model. Then, I was trying to retrieve the correct pronunciation whenever I could, for example walking down the street.

    What else, dun dun dun. Oh! I've learnt a lot just singing songs the pronunciation of single words, copying the rhythm, connected speech, accent, it's quite nice if you're into singing in the first place. *And* if people around you are understanding enough.

    I couldn't forget about reading in English; it has helped me immensely. It just brings your focus to collocations, everyday language (depending on what you read), vivid phrases, new vocabulary, synonyms. Reading labels on products can teach you a lot, too. Generally speaking, resourcing (using target language reference materials) works wonders.
    Actually, I find using this forum very helpful. When reading native speakers' posts, not only do I pay attention to what they write, but also how they write it. Not because I expect it to be uber-correct but because it has this natural flow to it. And of course you get to learn new phrases, my most recent one is 'in flux'.


    Phew, my collection of thoughts ends here for now. It really IS a broad subject.


    nyota, I ENVY your being so patient!!!

  8. #8
    nyota's Avatar
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    Default Re: Language Learning Strategies:)

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    nyota, I ENVY your being so patient!!!
    I never knew I was patient until I wrote that post!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Language Learning Strategies:)

    That's true Nyota, using "Learning Strategies" depends on the leaner, as you said maybe the strategy which helped me to learn will not help you because your level is not like mine...for that many researchers have made lots of taxonomies of "Language Learning Strategies" in order to help students choose the one they think it might help them facilitate their learning and solving their problem. So what should we do? We have to read as long as we can about Learning Strategies.

    Good luck

  10. #10
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Language Learning Strategies:)

    Quote Originally Posted by nyota View Post
    Speaking of which, embarrassment is a very effective memory strategy. I remember how I was once chatting with a friend and I wanted to tease him about a spelling mistake he made, so I went '*how embarassing!'. At least he had a laugh. I can assure you I haven't made that mistake since.
    This is worth quoting in a separate post in my opinion.

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