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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default don't want to confuse ss with phrasal verbs

    I have to teach a lesson on phrasal verbs and I don't want to freak out the class by saying there are no rules for when the parts can be seperated- they either are or aren't.

    Is there a way to introduce these intermediate students to phrasal verbs without saying- just memorise them and run for the door?

    Thank you very much... Kiwi

  2. #2
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Re: don't want to confuse ss with phrasal verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi
    I have to teach a lesson on phrasal verbs and I don't want to freak out the class by saying there are no rules for when the parts can be seperated- they either are or aren't.

    Is there a way to introduce these intermediate students to phrasal verbs without saying- just memorise them and run for the door?

    Thank you very much... Kiwi


    http://www.vic.uh.edu/ac/efl/phrasalverbs.html

    http://www.thaitesol.org/bulletin/1002/100207.html

    These first two links might be of some help in that area.



    These others don't offer much in the way of explanations, but they might also be of some help.

    http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handou...slphrasal.html

    http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handou...slphrasal.html

    http://www.augsburg.edu/writinglab/twopartverbs.htm

    http://unrestrictedarea.com/english%...v/chapter2.htm

  3. #3
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Re: don't want to confuse ss with phrasal verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi
    I have to teach a lesson on phrasal verbs and I don't want to freak out the class by saying there are no rules for when the parts can be seperated- they either are or aren't.

    Is there a way to introduce these intermediate students to phrasal verbs without saying- just memorise them and run for the door?

    Thank you very much... Kiwi
    Here are two charts and an excerpt from one of the sites I left. This could be of some help. I'll need to check into that myself as well. It appears as though this won't be the easiest thing to explain to your students. I wouldn't spend too much time on the explanations offered here. Memorization might be easier, but you can be the judge of that. We do what we think is best for the situation. They say an intransitive verb is always inseparable. I'll check that out. 8) 8)

    For the second difficulty, there are several different solutions depending on the construction of the phrasal verb. First of all, it is important to know that phrasal verbs can either be transitive (the verb takes a direct object) or intransitive (the verb cannot take a direct object).
    Transitive phrases are those that can take a direct object. Some transitive verbal phrases are separable. That is, the verb can be separated from the preposition by a direct object. If the direct object is a noun it may or may not come between the verb and the preposition; however, if the direct object is a pronoun, it must come between the verb and the preposition.

    There are no rules for helping you to determine which transitive phrases are inseparable; you just have to memorize them. In these cases the verb and the preposition or adverb cannot be separated by the direct object.

    Intransitive phrases are those that do not take a direct object and cannot be separated.








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