Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: AT A LOOSE END

  1. #1
    beachboy's Avatar
    beachboy is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    656
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default AT A LOOSE END

    I FEEL RATHER AT A LOOSE END
    Does it mean I'm bored because I have nothing to do, or something has happened and I don't know what to do? Is this expression common in the USA?

  2. #2
    montfan is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: AT A LOOSE END

    I am not a teacher, and I looked up the idiom on this website.

    It means the first one. It is not very common in the United States.

  3. #3
    TheParser is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    5,038
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: AT A LOOSE END

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    I FEEL RATHER AT A LOOSE END
    Does it mean I'm bored because I have nothing to do, or something has happened and I don't know what to do? Is this expression common in the USA?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    I believe that the expression is "at loose ends."

  4. #4
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,652
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: AT A LOOSE END

    "At a loose end" is quite common in BrE.

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,290
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: AT A LOOSE END

    We have at a loose end as BrE and at loose ends at AmE; is this correct? Thanks

  6. #6
    TheParser is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    5,038
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: AT A LOOSE END

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    We have at a loose end as BrE and at loose ends at AmE; is this correct? Thanks
    Cambridge Dictionary Online says that "at a loose end" is British and

    Australian, and "at loose ends" is American. Both mean "to have

    nothing to do."

    ***

    EnglishClub.com feels there is a difference:

    "At loose ends" seems [my emphasis] to indicate a state of

    unhappy restlessness that results from having nothing to do.

    The British idiom simply means having nothing to do.

  7. #7
    JMurray is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,712
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: AT A LOOSE END

    EnglishClub.com feels there is a difference:
    "At loose ends" seems to indicate a state of unhappy restlessness that results from having nothing to do".


    I feel the Aust/NZ use of "at a loose end" generally implies restlessness too.

  8. #8
    probus's Avatar
    probus is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2,091
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: AT A LOOSE END

    On this one, Canada follows the American rather than the British usage -- at loose ends.

Similar Threads

  1. surveying; end-to-end systems
    By milan2003_07 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 26-Jan-2011, 23:31
  2. Son to end all sons, father to end all fathers
    By pascal in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Feb-2010, 18:05
  3. play loose with = play fast and loose with?
    By thedaffodils in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-May-2008, 19:40
  4. At a loose end
    By Kerim in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-Jun-2006, 16:20
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-Jul-2005, 17:05

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •