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  1. #21
    Hucky is offline Member
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    Default Re: I`ve a good knowledge of English. - Have I really?

    Quote Originally Posted by Airone View Post
    Interesting question, and a tricky one to answer.

    When I say "the people I have known" I'm referring to my life experience and its effect on the opinion that I have now. Exactly When I knew these people isn't important, but it did happen at some point up to and including now.

    Compare: "I knew a lot of people in university" (the implication is that now I'm not in university, or I don't know a lot of people, or both.)

    "I've known a lot of people who use 'do you have' but not 'have you'" (the point when I knew the people, or even if I still know them is not important.)
    You couldn`t have paraphrased the meaning of the present perfect in a better way than you did in your first paragraph. Now I am sure that you did not have the past tense in mind. But wouldn´t the present perfect imply the present tense: people I know? In other words, when I say: "I have known my friend since we went to school." does that not mean: "I still know him." so that it would properly do without the latter? Or did you mean by using the present simple in addition to the present perfect to render some extra information or to put emphasis on some aspect that is not implied in the latter?

  2. #22
    Airone is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: I`ve a good knowledge of English. - Have I really?

    But wouldn´t the present perfect imply the present tense: people I know?

    Not necessarily. If I remember correctly, grammar books usually get around this by saying the present perfect implies "some effect" on the present. This is also why the present perfect is difficult to teach. For example, if I say "I've been with 200 women", it doesn't mean I am with a woman at this moment.

    In other words, when I say: "I have known my friend since we went to school." does that not mean: "I still know him." so that it would properly do without the latter?

    In this case yes, but "since" and "for" sentences are more straightforward.

    Or did you mean by using the present simple in addition to the present perfect to render some extra information or to put emphasis on some aspect that is not implied in the latter?

    Think of it this way: If I say "I've been to Hungary 3 times" it's not clear where I am now. Same with "I've known many English speakers". With only that sentence, I might not know any at the moment.

    So I meant to communicate that not only have I known many native English speakers over the course of my life, but I also know them currently. (and only two have said "I haven't a lighter" :D)

  3. #23
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    Default Re: I`ve a good knowledge of English. - Have I really?

    One little point that has gone unmentioned so far is that while "I've" may be rare in the affirmative it is not uncommon in the negative.

    Back at at the beginning of the thread when 5jj said "I've no idea who ..." it sounded natural and common. Later Thatone said it was not uncommon.

    In my part of the world "I've no ..." is pretty common.

    I've no problem with that.
    I've no trouble believing ...

    And we sometimes hear "I've not ..." especially among highly educated speakers. "I've not seen that before" would sound quite natural between a pair of professors or lawyers.

  4. #24
    Vidor is offline Member
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    Default not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    One little point that has gone unmentioned so far is that while "I've" may be rare in the affirmative it is not uncommon in the negative.

    Back at at the beginning of the thread when 5jj said "I've no idea who ..." it sounded natural and common. Later Thatone said it was not uncommon.

    In my part of the world "I've no ..." is pretty common.

    I've no problem with that.
    I've no trouble believing ...
    Not in America. An American would say "I have no" or "I've got".

    And we sometimes hear "I've not ..." especially among highly educated speakers. "I've not seen that before" would sound quite natural between a pair of professors or lawyers.
    Never heard this either. "I have not" or "I've never".

  5. #25
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Vidor View Post
    Not in America. An American would say "I have no" or "I've got".
    By "America", do you mean the US?

  6. #26
    Airone is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    By "America", do you mean the US?
    When you hear someone referred to as American, do you think he might be from Mexico? I don't see how PC prescriptivism adds anything to the discussion.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Airone View Post
    When you hear someone referred to as American, do you think he might be from Mexico? I don't see how PC prescriptivism adds anything to the discussion.
    Well, Canadians are certainly North American

  8. #28
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Well, Canadians are certainly North American
    That's exactly why I asked the question. I don't know what PC prescriptivism is, what is it?

  9. #29
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    Default Re: not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    That's exactly why I asked the question. I don't know what PC prescriptivism is, what is it?
    We'd need a new thread for that, BC. I wouldn't worry, if I were you. In asking about the use of the word 'America' (not 'American' ), you were not being PC-prescriptivist.

  10. #30
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: not a teacher

    Oh, I get it. PC = political correctness, PC != personal computer.

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