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  1. #1
    vectra's Avatar
    vectra is offline Member
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    Default tackle vs deal with

    Hello,
    Here are two example sentences with the word 'tackle':

    As we noted in a previous post, we’ve undertaken a survey to find the answer to this question. The way we’ve tackled it is by asking people what gives them short-term gratification (happiness) and long-term benefits (meaning)–at work, and at home.

    This week, our Travel Guides tackle the pros and cons of all-inclusive vacations, and have tips on where to go for the best ones.

    Is it possible to change the word 'tackle' for deal with or analyze?
    What could be the subtle meanings in 'tackle' not easy to identify for a non-native speaker?

    Thank you for the time and help.
    Last edited by vectra; 27-Mar-2011 at 07:10. Reason: typo

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: tackle vs deal with

    Quote Originally Posted by vectra View Post
    As we noted in a previous post, we’ve undertaken a survey to find the answer to this question. The way we’ve tackled it is by asking people what gives them short-term gratification (happiness) and long-term benefits (meaning)–at work, and at home.

    This week, our Travel Guides tackle the pros and cons of all-inclusive vacations, and have tips on where to go for the best ones.

    Is it possible to change the word 'tackle' for 'deal with' Yes or 'analyze?' No. The analysis comes later.

    What could be the subtle meanings in 'tackle' not easy to identify for a non-native speaker?
    'Tackle' may suggest that more difficulties are expected than with 'deal with'.

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