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  1. #1
    Verona_82 is offline Senior Member
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    Default modern American usage?

    Hello,

    Yesterday I saw a teacher explaining a couple of things to her students. I was surprised to hear some of them, namely, claiming 'in a picture' and 'on a picture' mean the same. She also wrote 'Who did she walk with the dog?" instead of "who walked with the dog" as the original sentence read "She walked with the dog yesterday". I wouldn't even use 'with' as the student really meant taking the dog for a walk. The teacher's not a native, but she lived in the US for a long time. I'm wondering if I'm a bit behind the times and the structures she used are common is spoken English.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: modern American usage?

    Quote Originally Posted by Verona_82 View Post
    1. I was surprised to hear some of them, namely, claiming 'in a picture' and 'on a picture' mean the same.
    2. She also wrote 'Who did she walk with the dog?" instead of "who walked with the dog" as the original sentence read "She walked with the dog yesterday".
    3. I wouldn't even use 'with' as the student really meant taking the dog for a walk.
    1. 'In' is the natural preposition here. However, 'on' is not a jarring mistake, in my opinion, particularly if the teacher is pointing to a projected picture on the board. Not to be recommended, but not the end of the world.
    2. "Who did she walk with the dog?" is wrong, unless the question is: "Who did she walk with? The dog?"
    3.""I walked the dog" and "I went for a walk with the dog" are more natural to me, but "I walked with the dog" is acceptable.

  3. #3
    billmcd is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: modern American usage?

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    1. 'In' is the natural preposition here. However, 'on' is not a jarring mistake, in my opinion, particularly if the teacher is pointing to a projected picture on the board. Not to be recommended, but not the end of the world.
    2. "Who did she walk with the dog?" is wrong, unless the question is: "Who did she walk with? The dog?"
    3.""I walked the dog" and "I went for a walk with the dog" are more natural to me, but "I walked with the dog" is acceptable.
    1. I don't think you would ever hear/read "on the picture" in AmE regardless of whether the image was a projection-- unless there were some physical material of some sort pasted or adhering to the surface of the picture.

    Agree with your 2. & 3.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: modern American usage?

    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    1. I don't think you would ever hear/read "on the picture" in AmE regardless of whether the image was a projection-- unless there were some physical material of some sort pasted or adhering to the surface of the picture.
    I hope I didn't give the impression that it was 'correct' in BrE. I wanted to suggest that it was a mistake, but not one that would particularly disturb native speakers...

    ... of BrE, at leat

  5. #5
    freezeframe is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: modern American usage?

    "On the picture" refers to the surface of the picture, not its content. It sounds like a direct translation from Russian.

  6. #6
    Verona_82 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: modern American usage?

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    "On the picture" refers to the surface of the picture, not its content. It sounds like a direct translation from Russian.
    I wish some people knew it, too, before teaching this thing to their students.

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