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  1. #1
    birgit33 is offline Member
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    choice between two subjects...???

    In the sentence : "Most students study hard", what's the subject ? If I ask the question "who study hard", I get two answers, namely a) most students, and b) students. So what is the subject and why ?

    People walking along the river are doing exercises. Same question as above : is "people" the subject, or is "people walking along the river" the subject ? And why ?

  2. #2
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    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Re: choice between two subjects...???

    The subject of "Most students study hard" is the noun '"students", head of the noun phrase "most students".

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    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Re: choice between two subjects...???

    Quote Originally Posted by birgit33 View Post
    In the sentence : "Most students study hard", what's the subject ? If I ask the question "who study hard", I get two answers, namely a) most students, and b) students. So what is the subject and why ?

    People walking along the river are doing exercises. Same question as above : is "people" the subject, or is "people walking along the river" the subject ? And why ?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) This is what I learned in high school.

    (2) "Most students study hard."

    (a) Who study/studies hard? Most students.

    "Most students" is the complete subject.

    "Students" is the simple subject. The "simple subject" is the word(s) that

    is (are) absolutely necessary. As you can see "most" is not 100%

    necessary for a good English sentence. If you said, "Students study

    hard," that is a good English sentence. But you decided to add some

    more information ("most"). We could also say:

    Many students study hard./ Students who want a good future study

    hard. As you can see, the words "many" and "who want a good future"

    tell us more about the simple subject ("students"), but they are not

    necessary. Of course, "students" is necessary.

    (3) Now let's look at your second sentence:

    People walking along the river are doing exercises.

    Who is/are doing exercises? People walking along the river.

    If you were told to erase the words that were not necessary for a

    good English sentence, what words would you erase? In other words,

    does "People were doing exercises" sound like a good English sentence?

    I think that it does. THEREFORE, we could erase "walking along the river."

    People = simple/basic/essential subject.

    People walking along the river = complete (added information) subject.

    *****

    Consider this sentence:

    Good students who have questions about English grammar visit usingenglish.com.

    Who visit/visits usingenglish.com.? Good students who have questions about English grammar.

    What would you say is the simple subject? That is, what word is still there

    after we have erased (in our minds) all the unnecessary words (words

    that are nice and interesting but not 100% necessary to make a good

    English sentence).

    I think the answer is: students.

    Is "Students visit usingenglish.com." a good sentence? I think that it is.

    Is it 100% necessary to say "good" students or students "who have

    questions about English grammar"? I think it is not.

    Thus:

    students = simple subject.

    Good students who have questions about English grammar = complete subject.

    ***

    One more example:

    The girl with red hair wears beautiful dresses.

    Who wears beautiful dresses? The girl with red hair.

    What is the complete subject? The girl with red hair.

    What is the simple subject? (CAREFUL) I think the answer is: girl.

    (P.S. Of course, "with red hair" is not necessary information. And my

    books tell me that "the" is not 100% necessary. In other words, the

    sentence is basically: Girl + wears + dresses. That is the "skeleton" of

    "The girl with red hair wears beautiful dresses.")

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