View Poll Results: She sailed through her exams.

Voters
6. This poll is closed
  • "Sailed through" is a prepositional verb there.

    3 50.00%
  • "Sailed through" is a phrasal verb there.

    3 50.00%
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    M56 Guest

    Default She sailed through her exams.

    Please see poll.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: She sailed through her exams.

    Hmm. The wording has me somewhat confused. Phrasal verbs is a term used to describe both verb-adverb phrases and verb + prepositional phrases.

    Semantics aside, there are two simple tests that prove useful when determining the function of X in verb + X:

    [1] a verb followed by a preposition forms an expression with an idiomatic meaning.
    => Is 'sailing through' an idiom?

    [2] prepositions take nominal objects.
    => Is 'exams' the object of 'sailed' or the object of 'through':

    Preposition + object: She sailed through them.
    Verb + adverb: She sailed them through. (awkward)

    Consider,

    We leafed through the book.
    We leafed the book through. (awkward)

  3. #3
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: She sailed through her exams.

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Hmm. The wording has me somewhat confused. Phrasal verbs is a term used to describe both verb-adverb phrases and verb + prepositional phrases.

    Semantics aside, there are two simple tests that prove useful when determining the function of X in verb + X:

    [1] a verb followed by a preposition forms an expression with an idiomatic meaning.
    => Is 'sailing through' an idiom?

    [2] prepositions take nominal objects.
    => Is 'exams' the object of 'sailed' or the object of 'through':

    Preposition + object: She sailed through them.
    Verb + adverb: She sailed them through. (awkward)

    Consider,

    We leafed through the book.
    We leafed the book through. (awkward)
    <Hmm. The wording has me somewhat confused. Phrasal verbs is a term used to describe both verb-adverb phrases and verb + prepositional phrases. >

    But not in my camp.

    Yes, I agree with the test above. There are also more mini-tests:

    And how, but there are tests we can use to help us decide which is which.


    1. Phrasal verbs. We say that a verb is phrasal because the particle after it is an adverb. They are different to prepositional verbs because:

    1. The accent is on the particle, not on the verb.

    I'll put 'ON my trousers.

    2. If the complement is a pronoun, it cannot be placed after the particle.

    *I'll put on THEM.

    3. An adverb can't be placed between the verb and the particle.

    *I'll put CAREFULLY on my trousers.

    4. The particle cannot be placed before the relative pronoun.

    *The trousers ON which I put.

    5. The object (substantive) can be placed between the verb and the particle.

    I'll put MY TROUSERS on.

    6. The pronoun (object) must be placed between the verb and the particle.

    I'll put THEM on.

    2. Prepositional verbs. We say that a verb is prepositional when the particle is not an adverb but a preposition. They can be distinguished from the phrasal verbs for the following reasons:

    1. The accent is on the verb, not on the particle.

    I'll 'LOOK after the children.


    2. If the object (substantive) is substituted by a pronoun, it must be placed after the particle.

    I'll look after THEM.

    3. It is grammatically acceptable to include an adverb between the verb and the particle.

    I'll look CAREFULLY after the children.

    4. The particle can be placed before a relative pronoun.
    These are the children AFTER WHOM I looked.

    http://www.miguelmllop.com/grammars/...ar/adpreps.pdf

    So, in referring to point 1. above (in the phrasal verb section), we need to ask ourselves, whether it is "SAILED through his exams" or "sailed THROUGH his exams".

    In referring to 2. ("If the complement is a pronoun, it cannot be placed after the particle").

    "I'll sail through them" is OK.

    With 3., ("An adverb can't be placed between the verb and the particle.") Is this OK? "I'll sail quickly through my exams.

    Considering 4., ("The particle cannot be placed before the relative pronoun."):

    "The exams through which I sailed." seems fine.

    5. ("The object (substantive) can be placed between the verb and the particle.") shows:

    * "I'll sail my exams through." Incorrect.

    6. ("The pronoun (object) must be placed between the verb and the particle.") gives:

    *I'll sail them through. Incorrect.

    So, from that small test we can probably infer that the particle in "sail through" is a preposition and the compound is a prepositional verb.

    I would also say that not all phrasal and prepositional verbs are idiomatic. Take "look over" and "set up", for example.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: She sailed through her exams.

    Wonderful, . . . but, then, why the Poll?

  5. #5
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: She sailed through her exams.

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Wonderful, . . . but, then, why the Poll?
    Because there are different views to be heard.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: She sailed through her exams.

    Oh, I see.

Similar Threads

  1. Do exams have a negative impact on learning?
    By Red5 in forum UsingEnglish.com Content
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 17-Nov-2003, 12:19
  2. ANSWERS FOR 2001 PSAT EXAMS
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-Oct-2003, 21:38
  3. Tips For Taking Exams and Tests
    By Red5 in forum UsingEnglish.com Content
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 29-Sep-2003, 13:23
  4. New! - Tips For Taking Exams and Tests
    By Red5 in forum News and Announcements
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 29-Sep-2003, 13:17

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •