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Thread: "missing audio"

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    #11

    Red face Re: "missing audio"

    Quote Originally Posted by Route21 View Post
    Hi maiabulela

    With reference to "enjoy [that astep]", I assume what is meant is "enjoy that aspect".

    Does this make reasonable sense in your context?

    Best regards
    R21

    PS Some further thoughts:

    "If I'm a clerk, how does this tie in with me always being a leader and really enjoying being a dance instructor - and how does this tie in with if I'm anxious of me always being in front of people talking - and may be I should do comedy on the side because I really enjoy that aspect."

    Does this make any more sense?

    What exactly do you mean by "clerk" here?

    Thanks.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: "missing audio"

    Quote Originally Posted by maiabulela View Post
    Thanks.
    Do you kindly have any idea about what this expression might mean:
    "in front of people talking and may be I do comedy on the side because I really enjoy that aspect"

    The problematic words here is:
    "comedy" does it mean "mock"?
    "on the side" does it mean "behind their back"?

    I'll be so grateful if you help me even guess it.

    Thanks a lot.
    It's not a formal written sentence, that adheres to a fixed 'grammar' - he's 'thinking aloud' [that's an idiom - often used when someone doesn't have a clear idea yet, and wants to use someone as a 'sounding board' {another idiom!}: 'I'm not sure what I'll do, but - and I'm just thinking aloud here, so don't take it as a fixed plan,...]. '

    The speaker works in a normal job, and is a semi-profeesional comedian in his free time. He's thinking something like '[When I'm] in front of people and talking [I enjoy being the centre of attention and making them laugh; come to think of it] maybe I do comedy on the side [for that reason -] because I really enjoy that aspect [of my day-time job].

    b

    PS Feel free to send me the clip.
    Last edited by BobK; 08-Apr-2011 at 13:11. Reason: Format

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    #13

    Re: "missing audio"

    So, I listened to the audio and...

    Yes, the OP was right. This is some self-improvement/motivational stuff that uses the four temperaments model that's derived out of an extremely outdated theory of four humors.

    .... how do my hobbies line up with my temperament? of what I enjoy doing, does it kind of look the same? So, if I'm a cholelic, how does this tie in with me, you know, always being a leader and really enjoying being a dance instructor? Or how does, you know, this tie in with... um... if I'm a sanguine of me always being in front of people talking and maybe I do comedy on the side because I really enjoy, you know, that aspect.
    A great orator she isn't.

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    #14

    Re: "missing audio"

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    So, I listened to the audio and...

    Yes, the OP was right. This is some self-improvement/motivational stuff that uses the four temperaments model that's derived out of an extremely outdated theory of four humors.



    A great orator she isn't.
    You can say that again! But at least it explains the rogue articles: 'a choleric... a sanguine'. [Note for the confused: people who believe in this hocus pocus refer to a person with a choleric/sanguine/melancholic/phlegmatic disposition as 'a c.../s.../m.../p...'.]

    b

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    #15

    Re: "missing audio"

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    So, I listened to the audio and...

    Yes, the OP was right. This is some self-improvement/motivational stuff that uses the four temperaments model that's derived out of an extremely outdated theory of four humors.



    A great orator she isn't.

    I can't thank you enough, really. The structure is very difficult, though.
    Now, for sure, the picture is clearer but i think I will take some time to produce an organized target language :( I'll think about it again and rephrase it to be translatable

    Thanks aagin my dear.

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    #16

    Re: "missing audio"

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    So, I listened to the audio and...

    Yes, the OP was right. This is some self-improvement/motivational stuff that uses the four temperaments model that's derived out of an extremely outdated theory of four humors.



    A great orator she isn't.
    Also, THANKS A LOT for the reference. It lead me to some other sources in my language.

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    #17

    Re: "missing audio"

    Hi maiabulela

    Quote Originally Posted by maiabulela View Post
    What exactly do you mean by "clerk" here?

    Thanks.
    Apologies for the delay in replying - I'm struggling with my internet connection.

    Unaware of the context, subsequently provided by freezeframe, I was looking for a word that might possibly fit the context.

    See:
    clerk - definition of clerk by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.
    "A person who works in an office performing such tasks as keeping records, attending to correspondence, or filing."
    As such, a clerk is "support staff" rather than one of the decision-makers who "lead" the main tasks performed by the office concerned - and hence could have fitted in with the context.

    Interestingly, whilst looking up "clerk", I happened to notice the different AME vs UK English phonetic systems used - I'd never noticed it before.

    clerk (klūrk; British klärk) - The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language (AME)
    clerk [klɑːk (US and Canadian) klɜːrk] - Collins English Dictionary (UKE)

    To me, basically:
    "clerk" - AME rhymes with "perk"
    "clerk" - UKE rhymes with "park"

    Can any of the teachers out there advise: Is there/can there be a universal standard for phonetics?

    Every single Thai-English tutorial book that I find uses a totally different phonetic system, presumably partly due to the difference between AME and UKE phonetics - very confusing!


    Best regards
    R21

    PS Maybe this should be handled via a different forum?

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    #18

    Re: "missing audio"

    Quote Originally Posted by Route21 View Post
    Hi maiabulela



    Apologies for the delay in replying - I'm struggling with my internet connection.

    Unaware of the context, subsequently provided by freezeframe, I was looking for a word that might possibly fit the context.

    See:
    clerk - definition of clerk by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.
    "A person who works in an office performing such tasks as keeping records, attending to correspondence, or filing."
    As such, a clerk is "support staff" rather than one of the decision-makers who "lead" the main tasks performed by the office concerned - and hence could have fitted in with the context.

    Interestingly, whilst looking up "clerk", I happened to notice the different AME vs UK English phonetic systems used - I'd never noticed it before.

    clerk (klūrk; British klärk) - The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language (AME)
    clerk [klɑːk (US and Canadian) klɜːrk] - Collins English Dictionary (UKE)

    To me, basically:
    "clerk" - AME rhymes with "perk"
    "clerk" - UKE rhymes with "park"

    Can any of the teachers out there advise: Is there/can there be a universal standard for phonetics?

    Every single Thai-English tutorial book that I find uses a totally different phonetic system, presumably partly due to the difference between AME and UKE phonetics - very confusing!

    Best regards
    R21

    PS Maybe this should be handled via a different forum?

    British guide
    BBC Learning English | Pronunciation Tips

    American guide
    Phonetics: The sounds of American English

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    #19

    Re: "missing audio"

    Quote Originally Posted by Route21 View Post
    "clerk" - AME rhymes with "perk"
    "clerk" - UKE rhymes with "park" For me, too.

    Can any of the teachers out there advise: Is there/can there be a universal standard for phonetics?
    There is a universally accepted phonetic alphabet, the International Phonetic Alphabet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, in which each symbol represents one precisely defined sound. Trained phoneticians, whatever their native language, will use exactly the same symbol for any particular sound.

    However, within each language/dialect area, lexicographers, publishers and teachers use simpler systems that suit their needs. When you use a dictionary, you need to check which system they are using.

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