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  1. vectra's Avatar
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    #1

    infraction vs violation vs offense

    Hello,

    Here is a sentence from the article 'Why the Boss Can Steal Paper Clips, But You Better Not' by Kimberly Weisul on Bnet:

    'The test subjects were then presented with a list of possible infractions, ranging in severity from using company stamps for personal mail to verbally abusing a co-worker, and then asked how strongly each “Dave” should be sanctioned.'

    I am curious about the word 'infraction'. Is it used mainly in relation to rules of ethics in a company? Can it be changed for 'violation' or 'offense'?
    Here are more examples from the article:

    The big-shot was punished more severely for more serious infractions, such as withholding important work-related information from colleagues, verbally abusing a co-worker, or taking large kickbacks.
    There is more likely to be a disparity in the punishment if the offense is against the corporation versus against an individual employee.

    Why a sudden change of heart, and 'offense' is used instead of 'infraction'?

    Thank you very much in advance.

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    #2

    Re: infraction vs violation vs offense

    Quote Originally Posted by vectra View Post
    Hello,

    Here is a sentence from the article 'Why the Boss Can Steal Paper Clips, But You Better Not' by Kimberly Weisul on Bnet:

    'The test subjects were then presented with a list of possible infractions, ranging in severity from using company stamps for personal mail to verbally abusing a co-worker, and then asked how strongly each “Dave” should be sanctioned.'

    I am curious about the word 'infraction'. Is it used mainly in relation to rules of ethics in a company? Can it be changed for 'violation' or 'offense'?
    Here are more examples from the article:

    The big-shot was punished more severely for more serious infractions, such as withholding important work-related information from colleagues, verbally abusing a co-worker, or taking large kickbacks.
    There is more likely to be a disparity in the punishment if the offense is against the corporation versus against an individual employee.

    Why a sudden change of heart, and 'offense' is used instead of 'infraction'?

    Thank you very much in advance.
    NOT A TEACHER.

    Without looking up the words, I'd say that "offense" and "violation" have, more or less, the same meaning. "Violation" does sound stronger, though. An infraction is a minor offense.

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