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  1. #1
    Olenek's Avatar
    Olenek is offline Junior Member
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    Default idioms meaning "to risk"

    Hi everyone,

    I have found some idioms, meaning "to risk" in Russian dictionary:

    To take/ carry one’s life in one’s hands;
    To risk life and limb;
    To dice with death;
    To play with fire;
    To play Russian roulette.

    My questions are as in last theme:

    Are they really used in UK, USA or Australia nowdays? How often?
    Are there any differences in their using (maybe, different situations or reasons of getting angry)?

    How would you say, meaning "to risk"

    Many Thanks to everyone!

    Olya

  2. #2
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    Default Re: idioms meaning "to risk"

    Hi Olenek

    Yes, all 5 idioms are in current UKE usage, with the particular one to be used depending on the appropriate (similar) circumstances.

    I don't know how the "reasons of getting angry" fits into the picture.

    I'm also not sure how to interpret your last question: "How would you say, meaning 'to risk' ?"

    Hope this helps
    R21

  3. #3
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    Default Re: idioms meaning "to risk"

    Oops! Double posting whilst struggling with my internet connection!
    Last edited by Route21; 15-Apr-2011 at 11:09.

  4. #4
    Olenek's Avatar
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    Default Re: idioms meaning "to risk"

    Hi R21,
    Sorry for my "reasons of getting angry". They are from my previous theme.
    By question: "How would you say, meaning 'to risk' ?" I try to ask which of these idioms do you prefer to use? Or maybe you know another one, more colloquial?

  5. #5
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: idioms meaning "to risk"

    Choice is personal, but I wouldn't use risk life and limb much, possibly not at all.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: idioms meaning "to risk"

    I've never heard of to dice with death.

    to dance with death
    I am not sure how popular this expression is but I don't think it is uncommon.


    Not a teacher.



  7. #7
    Olenek's Avatar
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    Default Re: idioms meaning "to risk"

    Quote Originally Posted by SanMar View Post
    I've never heard of to dice with death.

    to dance with death
    I am not sure how popular this expression is but I don't think it is uncommon.


    Not a teacher.


    From the Oxford Dictionary of Idioms:

    "dice with death" - take serious risks.
    "Dice with" is used here in the general sense of 'play a game of chance with'. In the mid of 20th century "dice with death" was a journalistic cliche used to convey the risks taken by racing drivers; the expression seems for some time to have been especially connected with motoring, although it is now used of other risky activities. It gave rise to the use of "dicing'" as a slang word among drivers for "driving in a race" and it can be compared with "dicey" meaning "dangerous" a word which originated in 1950s air-force slang."

  8. #8
    Vidor is offline Member
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    Default not a teacher

    To dice with death;
    I believe I have heard this expression before, principally in British English. I'd say it's archaic.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: idioms meaning "to risk"

    Hi Vidor

    Maybe some of our younger members do regard mid 20th century as a little archaic?

    Regards
    [An archaic] R21

    PS I don't believe many would regard "The Beatles" as archaic music!

  10. #10
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Vidor View Post
    I believe I have heard this expression before, principally in British English. I'd say it's archaic.
    It doesn't sound archaic to me; you will [still] hear it used in BrE. But then, I might be showing my age.

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