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Thread: direct/directly

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    #1

    direct/directly

    1-He went direct to his boss.
    2-This matter is directly related to me.
    3-It hardly affects any of them directly.
    4-Inflation will directly affect the common man.

    While using as adverb, how can we ensure the correct usage? Is there any clear-cut rule about where to use 'directly' and where to use 'direct'(adverb)??

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    #2

    Re: direct/directly

    Quote Originally Posted by tipu s View Post
    1-He went directly to his boss.
    2-This matter is directly related to me.
    3-It hardly affects any of them directly.
    4-Inflation will directly affect the common man.

    While using as adverb, how can we ensure the correct usage? Is there any clear-cut rule about where to use 'directly' and where to use 'direct'(adverb)??
    Not a teacher.

    Hello!

    For my information direct is used as an (adjective). And Directly is used as an (adverb).

    Look at this example:

    1- The direct method, came as an alternative to the grammar method. (Adjective)
    - It was a direct question. (Adjective)
    2- Go directly through this way, you will find the bank. (Adverb)

    Your examples are correct except the first one.

    Good luck

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    #3

    Re: direct/directly

    Sorry, Karima, 'He went direct to his boss' is correct.

    Direct is a perfectly respectable adverb in this context.

    direct /dɪˈrɛkt, dʌɪ-/

    ▶adverb
    in a direct way or by a direct route.
    (WordReference dictionary)

    Rover

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    #4

    Re: direct/directly

    I would say "He went directly to his boss".

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    #5

    Re: direct/directly

    Quote Originally Posted by tipu s View Post
    1-He went direct to his boss.
    2-This matter is directly related to me.
    3-It hardly affects any of them directly.
    4-Inflation will directly affect the common man.

    While using as adverb, how can we ensure the correct usage? Is there any clear-cut rule about where to use 'directly' and where to use 'direct'(adverb)??

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) You have already received many good answers.

    (2) Do you know what Mr. Bryan A. Garner says? Many people

    (especially Americans) follow the advice in his A Dictionary of

    Modern American Usage. (I have changed a few of his words.)

    (3) We flew direct/directly from Dallas [in the state of Texas] to Frankfurt [in Germany]. = no stops. Mr. Garner says both are correct in
    American English.

    (4) They left directly [immediately] after the meeting.

    (5) She was directly responsible. = nobody in between.

    (6) directly [totally] opposite.

    (7) They will be going directly [soon]. Mr. Garner says this use is

    popular in the southern part of the United States.

    (8) Directly [as soon as] we saw him, we cheered. Mr. Garner says that

    this use is only in British English.


    *****


    This is NOT an easy matter. If you have a specific question, please

    post it here. The excellent teachers and many non-teachers will be

    delighted to answer.

    For example, a mother might tell her son: After school, come

    directly home. For some reason, you cannot use direct in this

    sentence. Maybe it's because of the word "home." Hopefully, a

    teacher will tell us the reason.

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    #6

    Re: direct/directly

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (7) They will be going directly [soon]. Mr. Garner says this use is

    popular in the southern part of the United States.
    NOT A TEACHER.

    I apologize for asking a question unconnected with this thread, but I'd like to know if "use" should or could be "usage" in TheParser's sentence. If "usage" refers to a particular way in which a word is used, then I would use it here instead of "use."

    I hope you won't interpret this as an attempt to show you up, TheParser; I just wanted to take this opportunity to have the differences between the two words clarified.

    Thanks a lot!

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    #7

    Re: direct/directly

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I would say "He went directly to his boss".
    I'd normally use 'direct' - in the OALD sense of 'without involving other people'. This is a personal choice; I do not consider 'directly' to be incorrect or inappropriate.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: direct/directly

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    I apologize for asking a question unconnected with this thread, but I'd like to know if "use" should or could be "usage" in TheParser's sentence. If "usage" refers to a particular way in which a word is used, then I would use it here instead of "use."
    There are a couple of thoughts here. usage/use'

    I'd suggest that discussion of this be continued in that thread, or in a new one, rather than here.

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    #9

    Re: direct/directly

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    NOT A TEACHER.

    I apologize for asking a question unconnected with this thread, but I'd like to know if "use" should or could be "usage" in TheParser's sentence. If "usage" refers to a particular way in which a word is used, then I would use it here instead of "use."

    I hope you won't interpret this as an attempt to show you up, TheParser; I just wanted to take this opportunity to have the differences between the two words clarified.

    Thanks a lot!

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) I accept full blame for the use (usage?) of "use." Mr. Garner

    did not use it. He simply wrote " ... is typical of southern AmE."

    (2) As everyone knows, you have a lawyer's mind. That is, you

    quite rightly are always looking for the le bon juste. (No, I canNOT

    pronounce it!!!)

    (3) Thanks to you, I shall now spend my Sunday trying to learn the

    difference between the two words. I look forward to studying the link

    given to us by one of the the best teachers at this site.

    (4) Don't worry about "showing me up." I need to be shown up.

    In fact, we all do. We want visitors to this website to have the

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  5. Karima-19's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: direct/directly

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Sorry, Karima, 'He went direct to his boss' is correct.

    Direct is a perfectly respectable adverb in this context.

    (WordReference dictionary)

    Rover
    Well, I appreciate your opinion but I think that saying: " He went directly to his boss" is better than saying "He went direct to his boss" anyway, I think that both of them work in this context.

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