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Thread: Language

  1. 2010's Avatar
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    #1

    Language

    I am listening to a sales call. The sales rep tries to make too many sales on the same call, that is, trying to sell too many products other than what the customer had asked for. This in turn triggers customer dis-satisfaction.

    So, my question is - can I say

    Reason for customer dis-satisfaction: too many sales pitch.

    What would be the best sentence to use.

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    #2

    Re: Language

    Quote Originally Posted by 2010 View Post
    I am listening to a sales call. The sales rep tries to make too many sales on the same call, that is, trying to sell too many products other than what the customer had asked for. This in turn triggers customer dis-satisfaction.

    So, my question is - can I say

    Reason for customer dis-satisfaction: too many sales pitch.

    What would be the best sentence to use.
    Hi, I am not an English teacher, but I am a native speaker. In the US, doing that would be referred to as "giving him the hard sell". To try to get him to buy a more expensive product that he wanted would be to "upsell" {although this is usually looked on as a good thing}. I think your sentence {phrase actually, because there is no subject} would be better as:

    reason for customer dissatisfaction: too hard of a sales pitch

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Language

    Quote Originally Posted by luschen View Post
    ... too hard of a sales pitch
    Is this standard AmE? In Aus, it's mainly children who use 'of' in constructions like this.

    "It's too hard [of] a problem for me."
    "She's too good [of] a child to do that."

  3. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Language

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Is this standard AmE? In Aus, it's mainly children who use 'of' in constructions like this.

    "It's too hard [of] a problem for me."
    "She's too good [of] a child to do that."
    It is not standard AmE.

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    #5

    Re: Language

    Yes, you are both right - sorry.

  4. 2010's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Language

    So what is the correct phrase to use?

  5. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Language

    Quote Originally Posted by 2010 View Post
    So what is the correct phrase to use?
    Luschen's suggestion is good. Just omit "of."

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    #8

    Re: Language

    I would say:

    salesperson oversold multiple products and confused the buyer

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    #9

    Re: Language

    Quote Originally Posted by susiedqq View Post
    I would say:

    salesperson oversold multiple products and confused the buyer
    Usually pushy salespeople don't confuse me but make me really pissed off.

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    #10

    Re: Language

    I wanted to buy a simple widget, as seen on TV.

    The saleperson complicated the sale with so many add-ons that I got totally confused and ended up just hanging up.

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