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    #1

    Cool British vs British subjects

    Hello:D

    What is the difference between "British" and "British subjects"?

    When can we use "British subjects"? in History?

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: British vs British subjects

    Subject in this context is both positive and negative. A subject is a citizen of a colony of the UK. A second-class citizen if you will. On the other hand, we say "subjects of Her Majesty", meaning members of the Commonwealth.

    So, the British are those with UK citizenship, while British subjects are citizens of other British territories subject to (under the rule of) the monarchy.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: British vs British subjects

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    A subject is a citizen of a colony of the UK. A second-class citizen if you will. On the other hand, we say "subjects of Her Majesty", meaning members of the Commonwealth.

    So, the British are those with UK citizenship, while British subjects are citizens of other British territories subject to (under the rule of) the monarchy.
    Thanks for bringing me up-to-date. I knew I was a British citizen, but thought that technically I was also a British subject. Apparently I have not been one for nearly thirty years.

    Amazing what you can discover in this forum.

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    #4

    Re: British vs British subjects

    Me too; I had thought that we were all subjects because we were in a monarchy, which has always grated.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: British vs British subjects

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Me too; I had thought that we were all subjects because we were in a monarchy, which has always grated.
    I suppose we are still the Queen's subjects. That's nice, isn't it?

    ps. Are we having a usingenglish street party for the nuptials?

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: British vs British subjects

    Right, I think it's an all men are kings but not all kings are men situation: subjects who are not Brits are merely subjects, whereas Brits can think of themselves as subjects of the monarch if they prefer, or just citizens of the UK. I think.

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    #7

    Re: British vs British subjects

    Many replies!!
    Thank you, konungursvia, fivejedjon, Tdol

    And whose the nuptials is it?

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: British vs British subjects

    Whose nuptials? -

    Miss
    Catherine Elizabeth Middleton and His Royal Highness Prince William Arthur Philip Louis of Wales, Royal Knight Companion of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society.
    Last edited by 5jj; 19-Apr-2011 at 14:05. Reason: typo

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    #9

    Re: British vs British subjects

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I suppose we are still the Queen's subjects. That's nice, isn't it?

    ps. Are we having a usingenglish street party for the nuptials?
    Absolutely- send me the link to the YouTube video of you singing the national anthem again, please.

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: British vs British subjects

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Absolutely- send me the link to the YouTube video of you singing the national anthem again, please.
    I am fourth from the left, 0.50-1.05: YouTube - God Save the Queen Sing-A-Long (arranged by Sir William Walton)

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