Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: To suspect

  1. #1
    Will17 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,179
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default To suspect

    Hello!

    I can't find a really clear answer....

    What's the right structure that goes with "to suspect"? :

    -To suspect someone to do something

    -To suspect someone to have done something

    -To suspect someone has done something

    -To suspect someone of having done something

    Thank you very much for your help.

    Will
    Last edited by Will17; 18-Apr-2011 at 19:02. Reason: The end was missing

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    15,269
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To suspect

    To suspect someone of having done something
    is correct.

    Rover

  3. #3
    Allen165 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Switzerland
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,676
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To suspect

    NOT A TEACHER.

    So is "I suspect he committed the crime." Without context, though, that sentence could mean either that you doubt he committed the crime or that you believe he did.

  4. #4
    freezeframe is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2,113
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To suspect

    Quote Originally Posted by Allen165 View Post
    NOT A TEACHER.

    So is "I suspect he committed the crime." Without context, though, that sentence could mean either that you doubt he committed the crime or that you believe he did.
    No. It means that I think he might have committed the crime. The word you're thinking of is an adjective.

  5. #5
    Allen165 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Switzerland
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,676
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To suspect

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    No. It means that I think he might have committed the crime. The word you're thinking of is an adjective.
    You're probably right that in my example "suspect" can't mean "doubt," but it can have that meaning.

    I suspect her motives = I have doubts about her motives

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] to think - to suspect
    By dilodi83 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 31-Mar-2011, 11:48
  2. [Vocabulary] suspect vs doubt
    By hitinvo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Jun-2010, 19:02
  3. doubt and suspect
    By Raen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-Nov-2008, 14:46
  4. suspect
    By mayclaire in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 31-Aug-2008, 15:13
  5. I suspect if/whether/that
    By angliholic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Oct-2007, 12:35

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •