Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Olenek's Avatar
    Olenek is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    68
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default On friendly footing; To crash a party

    Hi everybody,

    To be on friendly footing with someone = To be/ feel at home with someone - to feel comfortable, feel at ease with someone, without embarrassment.

    Which idiom is more common in your country?
    Or do you use another one?

    Thanks for all your answers!!!
    Last edited by Olenek; 22-Apr-2011 at 06:16.

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,493
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To crash a party

    They're all common. Also 'to be on first-name terms' (though this is culture-specific, as many people's second name is their given name).

    b

  3. #3
    freezeframe is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2,113
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To crash a party

    I'm confused. Neither of these have anything to do with crashing a party.

  4. #4
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,493
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To crash a party

    With my clairvoyant hat on, I think the unspoken context may be that someone feels so much at home with someone that s/he doesn't mind crashing their party. But I shared your confusion (until I put that hat on )

    b

  5. #5
    freezeframe is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2,113
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To crash a party

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    With my clairvoyant hat on, I think the unspoken context may be that someone feels so much at home with someone that s/he doesn't mind crashing their party. But I shared your confusion (until I put that hat on )

    b
    Interesting theory. But I'm not buying that hat.

  6. #6
    Olenek's Avatar
    Olenek is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    68
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To crash a party

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    I'm confused. Neither of these have anything to do with crashing a party.
    Sorry, friends! I'm thinking of English idioms too much!

    At first I wanted to ask about "To crash a party" But suddenly changed my mind.

    OK. I think the phrases "To crash the gate" and "To crash a party" (in regard to parties) are popular enough.
    Nouns "party-crasher" and "gate-crasher" arose from these phrases.
    I don't know whether other idioms with the same sense are used.
    Last edited by Olenek; 22-Apr-2011 at 08:57.

  7. #7
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,493
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To crash a party

    Quote Originally Posted by Olenek View Post
    Sorry, friends! I'm thinking of English idioms too much!

    At first I wanted to ask about "To crash a party" But suddenly changed my mind.

    OK. I think the phrases "To crash the gate" and "To crash a party" (in regard to parties) are popular enough.
    Nouns "party-crasher" and "gate-crasher" arose from these phrases.
    I don't know whether other idioms with the same sense are used.
    What leads you to think this? 'Crashing a gate' - if the expression exists at all - would involve actual violence (such as criminals might cause during a car chase). 'The masked man crashed the gate, and bits of wood flew everywhere'; here it means 'crashed through'. People don't crash through parties.

    'Gate-crasher' dates from 1927 (if not before - it takes a while for idiomatic usage to filter through to printed dictionaries - Online Etymology Dictionary; it means 'someone who goes to a party uninvited'. I think 'party-crasher' (not an expression I've ever heard) would - if ever used - be an attempt to explain [or dispense with a perceived need for an explanation of] either 'gate-crasher' or the abbreviated form 'crasher'. In my experience, abbreviated forms arise from whatever expressions they abbreviate.

    b

  8. #8
    SanMar's Avatar
    SanMar is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    554
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: On friendly footing; To crash a party

    Wanna(do you want to) crash their party?
    This is pretty common in Canada. I think in the States as well.

    Also related to crash if you are interested...
    -I'm gonna crash at his/her place. (Going to sleep over at someone's house usually after partying)

    -No I'm not going out tonight. I just wanna go home and crash.
    (I'm so tired that I just want to go home and do nothing except sleep.)

    In Canada it is usually said with wanna, gonna.

    Not a teacher.

  9. #9
    Olenek's Avatar
    Olenek is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    68
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To crash a party

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    What leads you to think this? 'Crashing a gate' - if the expression exists at all - would involve actual violence (such as criminals might cause during a car chase). 'The masked man crashed the gate, and bits of wood flew everywhere'; here it means 'crashed through'. People don't crash through parties.
    Russian dictionaries and "ABBY Lingvo" don't contain any information of violence in phrases: "To crash a party/ the gate" (they consider these idioms as synonyms):

    "gate-crash - to gain entry to (a party, concert, etc.) without invitation or payment Derived words: gate-crasher" (ABBY Lingvo)

    Wikipedia also binds terms: "Gate-crashing" and "gate-crasher". And it doesn't say about violence as a precondition of "Gate-crashing":

    "Gate-crashing, Gatecrashing or party crashing (specific to parties) is the act of attending an invite-only event without invitation.The person doing the gate-crashing is known as a gate-crasher."

    Gate-crashing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    "crash the gate - come to a party, concert or another event without being invited; enter without a ticket or without paying"

    crash the gate

    There is no word of masked man

  10. #10
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,493
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: To crash a party

    No, I didn't say there was such an implication. I said that 'gate-crasher' was not derived from the idea of crashing a gate. On the contrary, the expression 'crash a party' is an abridged form of 'enter a party as a gate-crasher'; the derivaation does not follow the route you suggested.

    b

Similar Threads

  1. Tense footing
    By Allen165 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Jan-2011, 13:58
  2. about crash
    By imthinker in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 14-Aug-2010, 09:22
  3. A favorable footing
    By motico in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Aug-2010, 05:20
  4. [General] footing
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 15-Jul-2010, 13:11
  5. [Vocabulary] environmental friendly or environmentally friendly?
    By jiaruchan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-Mar-2010, 16:24

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •