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  1. Olenek's Avatar
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    #1

    idioms meaning "to be in charge, to give the orders"

    Hi everybody,

    I've found two idioms with the sense "to be in charge, to give the orders":

    To run the show,
    To call the tune/ shots (from the expression: He who pays the piper calls the tune (19th c.)

    Are these phrases common in your country? Or do you use other idioms with the same sense?

    Many Thanks!

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: idioms meaning "to be in charge, to give the orders"

    Quote Originally Posted by Olenek View Post
    Hi everybody,

    I've found two idioms with the sense "to be in charge, to give the orders":

    To run the show,
    To call the tune/ shots (from the expression: He who pays the piper calls the tune (19th c.)

    Are these phrases common in your country? Or do you use other idioms with the same sense?

    Many Thanks!
    These are all frequently heard in AmE. The person in charge is often called the "top dog."

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: idioms meaning "to be in charge, to give the orders"

    Quote Originally Posted by Olenek View Post
    To run the show,
    To call the tune/ shots
    For me, neither necessarily means 'the person in charge'. They mean 'the person who actually controls things' -who may, of course, be the person in charge. Compare:

    The headteacher is Dr Jobsworth, but it's his deputy who runs the show.
    The new headteacher runs the show rather more efficiently than his predecessor.

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