Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. Olenek's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Apr 2011
    • Posts: 68
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    on a short leash

    Hi everybody,

    Idioms "To keep/ have someone on a short/ tight leash/ string" and "To keep a tight rein on someone" mean to control someone's activity completely.


    Which of them is more common in your country?
    Or do you use other idioms with the same sense?

    Many Thanks for all your answers!

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Apr 2011
    • Posts: 2
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: on a short leash

    in england we say "under the thumb" when it involves people in a relationship...
    on a short leash means to keep an eye on someone at a workplace or similar

  2. Olenek's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Apr 2011
    • Posts: 68
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: on a short leash

    And perhaps one more is "to have someone in your pocket" - to have power over someone, to control him.

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 15,854
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: on a short leash

    Quote Originally Posted by goldflinger View Post
    in england we say "under the thumb" when it involves people in a relationship...
    on a short leash means to keep an eye on someone at a workplace or similar
    I'm not sure why you didn't agree with 'to control someone's activity completely'. It seems to me that the whole workplace thing is a red herring.

    (The point of a short leash - in the original context of giving a dog very little latitude - is physical control; when you keep someone on a short leash [never, Olenek, string] you do more than just keep an eye on them.)

    b

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Apr 2011
    • Posts: 2
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: on a short leash

    to control somebody completely one may have to incarcerate them ...i didn't disagree i merely offered an alternative point of view
    the "workplace" was an example ....im not argumentative either that's an assumption that you alone jumped to
    and the real point my friend was not the leash at all more the analogy of the restraint......
    something it appears you have little of
    i was taught if you have nothing "GOOD" to add, then add nothing



    if your bored make a box everybody needs a box or two

  4. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 15,854
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: on a short leash

    In this forum, if you've nothing accurate to add, then add nothing -

    b

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 44,225
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: on a short leash

    Quote Originally Posted by Olenek View Post
    And perhaps one more is "to have someone in your pocket" - to have power over someone, to control him.
    That one is different to me- if you have someone on a short leash, you don't give them much freedom, but if you have them in your pocket, would refer more to corrupt relationships, like crooked politicians, etc.

  5. SanMar's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 554
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: on a short leash

    If it is an extremely short leash ... you got them by the short and curly.
    I wouldn't consider this rude but it isn't exactly polite. I wouldn't use it in a formal situation, actually I might, but most wouldn't.


    Not a teacher.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2011
    • Posts: 2,113
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: on a short leash

    To be tied to her (wife's/mother's/gf's) apron strings = when a guy is either too attached to his mommy or if his wife/gf controls him too much

    to have someone wrapped around your finger = control someone or manipulate them

    to be under someone's heel/have someone under your heel

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 44,225
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #10

    Re: on a short leash

    Quote Originally Posted by SanMar View Post
    If it is an extremely short leash ... you got them by the short and curly.
    In BrE, I hear the short and curlies used.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [General] the big dog doesn't take well to a leash
    By loctantruong in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24-Aug-2009, 03:49
  2. [Idiom] When tall is tall and short is short [written]
    By onesavage in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-May-2009, 15:49
  3. a short, shorts, the short,or the shirts?
    By WUKEN in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 16-Mar-2009, 17:30
  4. Question: cover off the short-term or not short-term
    By KIMJONGEUN in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-Jun-2008, 13:13

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •