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  1. #1
    cheelv is offline Newbie
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    Default in his lordly best

    Dear teachers,

    I've searched in many places but couldn't still find the meaning of this phrase:

    The next day at Kumaon lawns, Ryan was in his lordly best. “Guys, listen to me.”
    "No way, you can't do this. Please, stop this nonsense," Alok said.


    Could you please explain or give the alternative sentence so I can grab the meaning?

    Thanks a lot for your help :)

    Cheelv

  2. #2
    freezeframe is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: in his lordly best

    Is there context? Who's Ryan? What's going on?

  3. #3
    cheelv is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: in his lordly best

    The context is Ryan was trying to involve his friends to steal the major test papers in their prof's room. But Alok, one of his friend, didn't agree at all.

    Thanks Mr.freezeframe :)

  4. #4
    freezeframe is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: in his lordly best

    It could refer to his clothes or to his manner or both. He behaves like a lord: authoritative, impressive, proud, etc. Or he dresses in fine clothes. It depends on the context. But the manner of behaviour seems more likely. But then I would expect "at his lordly best", not "in". So, maybe it means his clothes. You'll have to see the context around it.

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