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  1. #1
    Mehrgan's Avatar
    Mehrgan is offline Key Member
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    Default 'mood' Vs 'temper'?

    Hi,
    Could anyone please tell me what the difference is? I hear that temper is a bad mood. Does that suggest that temper is negative in itself? (then, how about sweet-tempered?)


    Thanks.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: 'mood' Vs 'temper'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi,
    Could anyone please tell me what the difference is? I hear that temper is a bad mood. Does that suggest that temper is negative in itself? (then, how about sweet-tempered?)


    Thanks.
    "A temper" (noun) is a bad mood. "Sweet-tempered" is an adjective. "Temper" can also be a verb. Look them up in a dictionary.

  3. #3
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: 'mood' Vs 'temper'?

    "Temper" as a noun may not mean bad mood. One can have an even temper or a good temper. (One can lose one's temper.)

    A couple of quotations:
    Wonderful, what weeks of flight can do for a naturally mild temper.
    Peter S. Beagle, Quarry, 2004
    Keeping my hands entwined with hers, I told her about the funeral, recounting the eulogium and the remarks of the clergyman on Grandfather's excellent temper, his scholarly reputation, his liberality.
    Deanna Raybourn, The dead travel fast, 2010
    I ordered the farmer's special: three pancakes, three eggs, a side of scrapple. (In Lancaster County, appetite trumps diplomas.) Beulah asked for coffee-no sugar, no cream-and, as an afterthought, two eggs. Waiting for the food, she barely spoke. Shyness around an unfamiliar man? Maybe shame? Or the meek temper of Gelassenheit. It's the personal submission the Amish strive for-self-denial for community's sake -- and a lack of it was Beulah's supposed crime.
    Michael Lowenthal, An expert in excommunication, 2002

    "Temper" is however far more often used to mean bad mood than just mood.

  4. #4
    TheParser is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: 'mood' Vs 'temper'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi,
    Could anyone please tell me what the difference is? I hear that temper is a bad mood. Does that suggest that temper is negative in itself? (then, how about sweet-tempered?)


    Thanks.

    ***** A NON-TEACHER's COMMENT *****


    (1) I agree that usually "temper" has a negative connotation.

    (2) For example, I know someone who loses his temper quite

    quickly. Sometimes when he goes to a store (where, for example,

    the sales associates -- a nice term for "clerks" -- are rude), I will

    often say to him:

    "Watch your temper." ( = Don't let those clerks make you angry.)

    I would never say: Don't lose your mood. (That would sound

    ridiculous.)

    Respectfully yours,


    James

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: 'mood' Vs 'temper'?

    There are some exceptions like even-tempered.

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