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  1. #1
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
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    Default coin from one language

    Can I say to coin a word from one language into another?

    "Some words were coined from German in to English."

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: coin from one language

    I wouldn't. Words are borrowed or adopted from other languages. To coin a phrase is to come up with something new.

  3. #3
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: coin from one language

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I wouldn't. Words are borrowed or adopted from other languages. To coin a phrase is to come up with something new.
    Is it the problem with "into another language"? Could I say "coined from a language"?

  4. #4
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: coin from one language

    No.

    As Dave said, it's borrowed or adopted.

    Rover

  5. #5
    Verona_82 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: coin from one language

    I guess words can also creep into a language.
    Some German words crept into English.

  6. #6
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: coin from one language

    Quote Originally Posted by Verona_82 View Post
    I guess words can also creep into a language.
    Some German words crept into English.

    "Coventrate. Verb meaning to 'utterly destroy'. Coined from the German verb 'Coventiren'."

    Would this have been written wrongfully?

  7. #7
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: coin from one language

    "Coventrate. Verb meaning to 'utterly destroy'. Coined from the German verb 'Coventiren'."

    Would this have been written wrongfully?
    Yes. It was derived from the German verb.

    Rover

  8. #8
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: coin from one language

    Interesting word, coventiren. I wonder if the bombing of Coventry in 1940 (Coventry Blitz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) was a rather sick pun - or maybe that event is what persuaded a German speaker to coin the word (in which case it's bitterly ironic that English took the word back and angilicized it with an '-ate' ending). . . [Anyway, as has been said, coining is making up for the first time - as when a metal-worker takes a piece of metal and makes it into a coin.]

    b

  9. #9
    konungursvia's Avatar
    konungursvia is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: coin from one language

    I think to coin means to mint, to create anew.

  10. #10
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: coin from one language

    In BrE, you do hear people saying to coin a phrase when introducing or just after a cliché; it's heading towards autoantonym territory with some speakers.

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