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  1. #1
    Bushwhacker's Avatar
    Bushwhacker is offline Senior Member
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    Cool despite and despite the fact that

    I have a doubt about the use of "despite" and "despite the fact that".

    Is it a good criterion to use "despite" when what follows is not a sentence?

    For instance, despite his bad temper...

    And to use "despite the fact that" when what follows is a sentence?

    For instance: despite the fact that you are here, I won't come...

    Thanks for your help

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: despite and despite the fact that

    I suggest you banish "despite the fact that" from your writing. It's wordy and adds nothing that a rewrite couldn't do better.

    Despite your presence, I won't come.

    If you have other "despite the fact that [sentence]" examples and you want to post a couple, I'll show you how they can be improved (at least in my opinion) by removing that phrase.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
    Bushwhacker's Avatar
    Bushwhacker is offline Senior Member
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    Cool Re: despite and despite the fact that

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I suggest you banish "despite the fact that" from your writing. It's wordy and adds nothing that a rewrite couldn't do better.

    Despite your presence, I won't come.

    If you have other "despite the fact that [sentence]" examples and you want to post a couple, I'll show you how they can be improved (at least in my opinion) by removing that phrase.

    Thank You for your interest and help. Precisely I have posted a review so that it was revised and here is a sentence which has beed amended:

    "What became interesting in Friedkinís movie was its serious tone for this horror tale in a way it was possible not to consider the story as a fantastic one despite it was. "

    And the correction is:

    What was interesting in Friedkinís movie was its serious tone for this horror tale in a way it was possible not to consider the story as a fantastic one despite the fact that it was.

    So, is better not to use "despite the fact that"?


    Thanks.

  4. #4
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: despite and despite the fact that

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhacker View Post
    What was interesting in Friedkinís movie was its serious tone for this horror tale in a way it was possible not to consider the story as a fantastic one despite the fact that it was.

    So, is better not to use "despite the fact that"?

    Thanks.
    In your sentence, it would be grammatical impossible to use only "despite it was."

    However, try this:

    What was interesting in Friedkinís movie, a horror tale, was that its serious tone made it possible to think of this story as realistic, despite its fantastical nature.

    Did you mean "think of it as realistic" when you said "possible not to consider the story as a fantastic"?

    Fantastic also means "really, really good" so it may be best to avoid that.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. #5
    Bushwhacker's Avatar
    Bushwhacker is offline Senior Member
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    Cool Re: despite and despite the fact that

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    In your sentence, it would be grammatical impossible to use only "despite it was."

    However, try this:

    What was interesting in Friedkinís movie, a horror tale, was that its serious tone made it possible to think of this story as realistic, despite its fantastical nature.

    Did you mean "think of it as realistic" when you said "possible not to consider the story as a fantastic"?

    Fantastic also means "really, really good" so it may be best to avoid that.
    Thank You again. Yes I wanted to mean what you propose instead. Could you say to me the reason why my "despite it was" is grammatically impossible in my sentence. Just to know it.

    Extremely grateful

  6. #6
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: despite and despite the fact that

    Hopefully, a teacher will come by to confirm this speculation. Despite needs to come before a noun or noun phrase (including a gerund).

    Despite his ineptness, he was hired.
    Despite your being such a nice guy, I can't date you any longer.
    Despite your status as a movie star, you still need to take out the garbage.
    Despite my cold, I want to go to the party.
    Despite the pain, he continued to play in the championship game.

    "It was" is not a noun phase. "The fact that it was" is a noun phrase.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. #7
    Bushwhacker's Avatar
    Bushwhacker is offline Senior Member
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    Cool Re: despite and despite the fact that

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Hopefully, a teacher will come by to confirm this speculation. Despite needs to come before a noun or noun phrase (including a gerund).

    Despite his ineptness, he was hired.
    Despite your being such a nice guy, I can't date you any longer.
    Despite your status as a movie star, you still need to take out the garbage.
    Despite my cold, I want to go to the party.
    Despite the pain, he continued to play in the championship game.

    "It was" is not a noun phase. "The fact that it was" is a noun phrase.
    Really grateful. I see now.

  8. #8
    freezeframe is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: despite and despite the fact that

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    In your sentence, it would be grammatical impossible to use only "despite it was."

    However, try this:

    What was interesting in Friedkinís movie, a horror tale, was that its serious tone made it possible to think of this story as realistic, despite its fantastical nature.

    Did you mean "think of it as realistic" when you said "possible not to consider the story as a fantastic"?

    Fantastic also means "really, really good" so it may be best to avoid that.
    Fantastic is a genre. Fantastical should not be used here.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: despite and despite the fact that

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhacker View Post
    Thank You again. Yes I wanted to mean what you propose instead. Could you say to me the reason why my "despite it was" is grammatically impossible in my sentence. Just to know it.

    Extremely grateful
    "despite that it was" works acceptably for me.
    I don't like "despite the fact that" either.

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