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Thread: a hang sandwich

  1. #1
    AlexAD's Avatar
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    Default a hang sandwich

    Hello, there.

    There was an Irishman who was talking to an American woman. She asked him to bring her something to eat. He said, and I quote, "I'll do you a hang sandwich". She answered, "What's a hang?", 'Hang is a verb', 'It's not a sandwich'.

    I would suggest that's got something to do with Irish English.

    I would appreciate any comments you might have.

    Thanks,
    Alex.

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    Default Re: a hang sandwich

    It's a ham sandwich. When said with an Irish accent, "ham" comes out sounding more like "hang".

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    Default Re: a hang sandwich

    I really don't understand at all. 'M' is pretty consistently pronounced between American and British and Irish English. Maybe the vowel sound was very short and maybe the Irishman was talking very quickly, but I think the real problem was with the listener.

    Some people have a terrible habit of not analysing what they think they hear people say, and just assuming that they say completely ridiculous things.

  4. #4
    freezeframe is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: a hang sandwich

    Answers.com - What is a hang sandwich
    Answer: Simply Irish slang for a ham sandwich! :)


  5. #5
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    Default Re: a hang sandwich

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_Ben View Post
    I really don't understand at all. 'M' is pretty consistently pronounced between American and British and Irish English. Maybe the vowel sound was very short and maybe the Irishman was talking very quickly, but I think the real problem was with the listener.

    Some people have a terrible habit of not analysing what they think they hear people say, and just assuming that they say completely ridiculous things.
    I definitely don't think that came out like ham. At least to the best of my hearing. He didn't speak that quickly, either, so if I were a listener I would probably hear hang rather than ham. It was something between m and n at the end.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: a hang sandwich

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    Yikes! It seems it's a deliberate mispronunciation from out in the country! hang sandwich - ham sandwich That's almost as bad as rhyming slang, but at least rhyming slang is funny and kind of makes sense.

  7. #7
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: a hang sandwich

    You'll hear sandwich pronounced in a variety of ways in different dialects - samwidge, sanwitch, sangwidge - to name but three.

    The pronuciation of ham is almost certainly similarly subject to regional variations.

    Rover

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    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: a hang sandwich

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Hello, there.

    There was an Irishman who was talking to an American woman. She asked him to bring her something to eat. He said, and I quote, "I'll do you a hang sandwich". She answered, "What's a hang?", 'Hang is a verb', 'It's not a sandwich'.

    I would suggest that's got something to do with Irish English.

    I would appreciate any comments you might have.

    Thanks,
    Alex.

    ***** A NON-TEACHER's COMMENT *****

    Learners should not be shocked if people from a certain

    English-speaking country tell them: Have a good die.

    (instead of "day.")


    Respectfully yours,


    James

  9. #9
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    Default Re: a hang sandwich

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** A NON-TEACHER's COMMENT *****

    Learners should not be shocked if people from a certain

    English-speaking country tell them: Have a good die.

    (instead of "day.")


    Respectfully yours,


    James
    Yeah! I would go ahead and say, 'Enjoy you die' (as opposed to day).

    I, personally, was surprised when a friend of mine who lives in California replied to my question, I quote, 'Piece of cake' (that is OK in his neck of the woods).

  10. #10
    freezeframe is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: a hang sandwich

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Yeah! I would go ahead and say, 'Enjoy you die' (as opposed to day).

    I, personally, was surprised when a friend of mine who lives in California replied to my question, I quote, 'Piece of cake' (that is OK in his neck of the woods).
    That's an idiom though, not a "mispronunciation". It means that something is easy.

    Piece of cake

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