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    #1

    British vs American slang

    I found this video amusing:
    YouTube - Hugh Laurie: the British accent vs the American

    Hugh Laurie and Ellen Degeneres take it turns to see how much of British/American slang the other knows.

    I've run through the comments and found out most British/American people don't use those slang words much. However, one might find it good to be aware of their existence :)

    P.S. I especially liked "chuffed to bits by your ba-donka-donk"
    Last edited by Verona_82; 09-May-2011 at 09:47.

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    #2

    Re: British vs American slang

    I knew "chuffed to bits" (British) and "shawty" (American). Shawty, or shorty, is fairly known in US hip hop culture. Never heard any of the other ones.

    Some US pop culture trivia for those who are interested-the song Ellen was quoting from during the "shawty" discussion is called Low, by hip hop artist Flo Rida.

    YT Link | YouTube - Flo Rida ft. T-Pain - Low
    Lyrics | FLO RIDA - LOW LYRICS

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    #3

    Re: British vs American slang

    People use chin-wag, though it may be a bit dated.

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    #4

    Re: British vs American slang

    that video is really funny, but I agree about most of them being dated

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: British vs American slang

    Quote Originally Posted by britintheUS View Post
    that video is really funny, but I agree about most of them being dated
    harrrummpphh. If it is good enough for decent people, it is good enough for you young flibbertigibbets. "Dated!" Pshaw!

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    #6

    Re: British vs American slang

    I don't think "badonkadonk" is dated. It seems to be more of a flibbergibbet word.

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    #7

    not a teacher

    As an American I'm proud of my branch of the language, but British English does have a rich mine of curse words and insults.

  2. Wicked Pissah's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: British vs American slang


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    #9

    Re: British vs American slang

    it's difficult to identify american slang words. How can I know it when I read or listen

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    #10

    Re: British vs American slang

    Firstly, the context might help- slang is used more in informal contexts. But unless you know the word or phrase, you'll have to go to the dictionary to know that.

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