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  1. #1
    sunsunmoon is offline Member
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    Default police, who were on scene at 10:32 pm

    TV star caught drunken driving
    The collision caused a pile-up involving two other cars, but police, who were on scene at 10:32 pm, said no injuries were reported.

    Isn't "on the scene" correct?

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: police, who were on scene at 10:32 pm

    It's correct either way.

  3. #3
    freezeframe is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: police, who were on scene at 10:32 pm

    Quote Originally Posted by sunsunmoon View Post
    TV star caught drunken driving
    The collision caused a pile-up involving two other cars, but police, who were on scene at 10:32 pm, said no injuries were reported.

    Isn't "on the scene" correct?
    The in "on the scene" is usually dropped in headlines or in the lead of a news story.

  4. #4
    Dragonness is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: police, who were on scene at 10:32 pm

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    The in "on the scene" is usually dropped in headlines or in the lead of a news story.
    Seconding articles being dropped in headlines.

    In normal speech you can't drop the article here.

  5. #5
    sunsunmoon is offline Member
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    Default Re: police, who were on scene at 10:32 pm

    Two children die in Bristol house fire - Telegraph
    "Police and fire investigators are now at the scene to establish the cause of the fire."

    Do "at the scene" and "on the scene" mean the same thing? Would it okay to say "at scene" in place of "at the scene"?

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