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    #1

    Arrow A NEVER-FAILS PLAN

    would i write "a never-fail plan" or a "never-fails plan"?

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    #2

    Question Re: A NEVER-FAILS PLAN

    checking

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: A NEVER-FAILS PLAN

    Quote Originally Posted by Migg View Post
    Would I write "a never-fail plan" or a "never-fails plan"?
    Neither is familiar to me. What is the context?

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    #4

    Re: A NEVER-FAILS PLAN

    Without further context, which you haven't bothered to give, I'd say never-fail sounds marginally better, but I can't see myself using either term.

    Rover

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    #5

    Re: A NEVER-FAILS PLAN

    my original post was inspired by a sports article about golf. The first paragraph runs like:

    "If you're like me, your tee shots have a tendency to shoot into the woods faster than a scalded dog. Fear not, friends, there's a cure for all of us, as the New York Times tells us: a new, only-flies-straight golf ball! There's just one small catch ..."



    In the first paragraph, the phrase "a new, only-flies-straight golf ball" was used. Why is the plain form of "fly" not used in the modifier position?

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    #6

    Exclamation Re: A NEVER-FAILS PLAN

    checking

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    #7

    Angry Re: A NEVER-FAILS PLAN

    my original post was inspired by a sports article about golf. The first paragraph runs like:

    "If you're like me, your tee shots have a tendency to shoot into the woods faster than a scalded dog. Fear not, friends, there's a cure for all of us, as the New York Times tells us: a new, only-flies-straight golf ball! There's just one small catch ..."



    In the first paragraph, the phrase "a new, only-flies-straight golf ball" was used. Why is the plain form of "fly" not used in the modifier position?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: A NEVER-FAILS PLAN

    Quote Originally Posted by Migg View Post
    my original post was inspired by a sports article about golf. The first paragraph runs like:

    "If you're like me, your tee shots have a tendency to shoot into the woods faster than a scalded dog. Fear not, friends, there's a cure for all of us, as the New York Times tells us: a new, only-flies-straight golf ball! There's just one small catch ..."



    In the first paragraph, the phrase "a new, only-flies-straight golf ball" was used. Why is the plain form of "fly" not used in the modifier position?
    Please do not keep re-posting your question. Have some patience.

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    #9

    Re: A NEVER-FAILS PLAN

    I'd move to the neo-Latin leg of English for this one:

    an infallible plan.

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