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  1. #1
    Will17 is offline Senior Member
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    Cool company's birthday or anniversary

    Hello!

    Which is the right word in this case, please:


    -We're going to celebrate the 51st company's anniversary.


    Thank you
    Will

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: company's birthday or anniversary

    "Anniversary" is good.

  3. #3
    GUS22 is offline Newbie
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    Re: company's birthday or anniversary

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    anniversity.
    ????? you having a laugh ?

    Anyway either are fine.

  4. #4
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: company's birthday or anniversary

    Anyway either is fine.
    GUS, please state that you are not a teacher.

    Rover

  5. #5
    GUS22 is offline Newbie
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    Re: company's birthday or anniversary

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    GUS, please state that you are not a teacher.

    Rover
    Either ARE fine.

    Either ie "both" both is plural. ie "they" ie "they are" ie either "are" fine.
    Either "is" fine is also correct - they "are" both fine because English is not logical . So you have a problem with correctly rendered grammar yet you have no problem with the word "anniversity" which exists in no dictionary known to mankind ?
    For the record I am a teacher with over 5 years experience and a Trinity TESOL I am also from the South of England so have pretty good grammar by anyones standards.
    Please do not start quoting some grammar book at me now - textbook grammatical rules are at best rough guides and just because a native speaker is speaking in a way that is not strictly by the book does not mean they are speaking grammatically incorrectly. It just means that language is a far too complex, flexible and organic for a textbook to fully explain . There are many grey areas and many of these so called "grammatical rules" are recent inventions which fulfil the need of non native speakers to have a clear set of rules to help them learn the language. One example the recently invented difference between "further" and "farther" which have been used interchangebly for centuries. Of course there is such a thing as good English - but language is in a constant state of flux . Grammar may vary for example in Ireland (hiberno English) or the North of England - but does that mean its wrong ? I do not - I believe it is a variation. Interestingly the closest to Old English , authentic English some might say, is from the North Of England which was settled by the angles not the saxons, received pronunciation and the southern accent is actually not the closest to the original English as most people presume.

    Anyway whats your opinion on the following :

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...ly-please.html
    Last edited by GUS22; 18-May-2011 at 19:54.

  6. #6
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Re: company's birthday or anniversary

    "Either are fine" is not standard English, GUS. As I understand Rover's remark, it is not based on this particular post of yours. You use incorrect punctuation and spacing in your other posts, which may make learners believe they should follow your example.
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 18-May-2011 at 19:55. Reason: sentence added, typos corrected

  7. #7
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: company's birthday or anniversary

    Quote Originally Posted by GUS22 View Post
    Either ARE fine.

    Either ie "both" both is plural. ie "they" ie "they are" ie either "are" fine.
    Either "is" fine is also correct - they "are" both fine because English is not logical . So you have a problem with correctly rendered grammar yet you have no problem with the word "anniversity" which exists in no dictionary known to mankind ?
    For the record I am a teacher with over 5 years experience and a Trinity TESOL I am also from the South of England so have pretty good grammar by anyones standards.
    Please do not start quoting some grammar book at me now - textbook grammatical rules are at best rough guides and just because a native speaker is speaking in a way that is not strictly by the book does not mean they are speaking grammatically incorrectly. It just means that language is a far too complex, flexible and organic for a textbook to fully explain . There are many grey areas and many of these so called "grammatical rules" are recent inventions which fulfil the need of non native speakers to have a clear set of rules to help them learn the language. One example the recently invented difference between "further" and "farther" which have been used interchangebly for centuries. Of course there is such a thing as good English - but language is in a constant state of flux . Grammar may vary for example in Ireland (hiberno English) or the North of England - but does that mean its wrong ? I do not - I believe it is a variation. Interestingly the closest to Old English , authentic English some might say, is from the North Of England which was settled by the angles not the saxons, received pronunciation and the southern accent is actually not the closest to the original English as most people presume.

    Anyway whats your opinion on the following :

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...ly-please.html
    Do you pay any attention to dictionaries?

    Either | Define Either at Dictionary.com

    When the pronoun either is the subject and comes immediately before the verb, the verb is singular:
    Either is fine. You shouldn't confuse the students here with your ignorance.

  8. #8
    GUS22 is offline Newbie
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    Re: company's birthday or anniversary

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    "Either are fine" is not standard English, GUS. As I understand Rover's remark, it is not based on this particular post of yours. You use incorrect punctuation and spacing in your other posts, which may make learners believe they should follow your example.
    Really . Thankyou once again for correcting my English my Polish friend. Really you are absolutely unbelievable - so perhaps you have done a degree in English and you actually have the gall to tell a native speaker they are speaking incorrectly. Your arrogance knows no bounds.
    Ok I can prove you wrong very easily and maybe then you will show a bit more humility , though I doubt it.
    first let us define "standard English"

    Standard English (often shortened to S.E. within linguistic circles) refers to whatever form of the English language is accepted as a national norm in an Anglophone country
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_English

    also note "there is no official or central regulating body defining Standard English"

    Note it does not say "what a non native speaker thinks is standard as a result of what he has read on some grammar website or a textbook he has read "

    So now we will search English speaking websites and forums for the term "either are fine" and see if it is a widely used phrase by native English speakers and thus fulfilling the definition of "standard English" :
    and "lo and behold " a google search of "either are fine" reveals :

    "either are fine" around 65.100 results. The fact that I will guarantee you that on none of these forums or blogs has anyone corrected them on their use of "either are fine" pretty much proves that it is not only accepted as a national norm but an international norm seeing as the internet is an international resource. I suggest you go and correct all 65,000 of them immediately - they are obviously in need of your superior understanding of their native language.
    The Cambridge exams do not define the English language - no textbook on Earth defines it - native speakers define it .
    Last edited by GUS22; 18-May-2011 at 20:13.

  9. #9
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Re: company's birthday or anniversary

    Quote Originally Posted by GUS22 View Post
    "either are fine" around 65.100 results. I suggest you go and correct all 65,000 of them immediately - they are obviously in need of your superior understanding of their native language.
    Try searching here: CORPORA: 45-425 million words each: free online access

  10. #10
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: company's birthday or anniversary

    Why pick on the Pole? You've had two native speakers correct your error.

    I have a hard time seeing how your contributions here are useful.

    Citing Google hits as proof of proper English is feeble.

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