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  1. #1
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    Default Intercepting Phrases

    Hi, my experts and teachers

    I hope you are in good mood.

    My preferred Newspaper is USA Today Newspaper so far. I usually come across some kind of truncated phrases--intercepting ones . Tell you what, read it yourself:
    “ Jurors rejected her plea, convicting her of murder, and she is serving life in prison. Yates becomes eligible for parole in 2041”
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/...14-yates_x.htm

    My question is :
    what sort of verb , phrase , “convicting her of murder”
    can it be read as “Jurors are convicting her of murder”?
    Waiting your comments.
    Have my rememberances
    Ayed ,
    :)

  2. #2
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    I think you mean interesting phrases. :wink:

    In the newpaper article it mentions that Yates claimed insanity. That is the plea the jurors rejected. They convicted her of murder.


    Quote Originally Posted by Ayed
    My question is :
    what sort of verb , phrase , “convicting her of murder”
    can it be read as “Jurors are convicting her of murder”?
    It is, I think, a participial phrase. Read it as that they convicted her of murder.

    Do you have any more?

    :D

  3. #3
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    RonBee.
    Thank you for your continuous healing stings, :wink:

    read from you soon.
    My greetings , in advance, be received .
    thanks
    Ayed,
    :D

  4. #4
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    I am curious. What do you mean by stings?

    :)

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    Default Re: Intercepting Phrases

    I agree with Ronbee. :)

    'convicting her' functions as a participle, an -ing adjective to be exact. Since it modifies the noun 'Jurors', we kind of expect it to be closer to the word 'Jurors', as in 2. below, and not separated from it by the verb phrase 'rejected her plea', as in 1.

    1. Jurors rejected her plea, convicting her,....
    2. Jurors, convicting her, rejected her plea,...

    But, 2. is unacceptable in terms of semantics (meaning), and here's the "why", if we place 'convict' before 'reject', we alter the sequence of events: first the jurors convicted her and then they rejected her plea. So, the author, in order to avoid that meaning, changed the verb 'convicted her' to an adjective 'convicting her' and placed it after the verb phrase 'rejected her plea' so as to express the events in the order they happened.

    Cas :D

    Waiting your comments => Waiting for your comments
    Have my rememberances => My Regards

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    Mr. RonBee,
    sting denotes your nickname RonBEE, :)
    got it now?


    -----------------
    Casiopea, thank you so much because you shed much light on my question.
    whisper :" Mr.RonBee may get upset if I praise you much than him"
    anyway,
    have my heartfelt regards
    thank you
    Ayed
    :)[/i]

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    Yes, I get it now. Thanks. :D

    Casiopea is very helpful. She comes up with all that grammar stuff right off the top of her head. I am glad you found her contribution useful.

    :D

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