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  1. #1
    Heidi is offline Member
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    Post agree with someone doing something?

    Dear teachers,

    Would you please tell me if this pattern- agree with someone doing something- correct? For example, do we say 'I don't think your father will agree with you spending money like that.?

    Thank you!

  2. #2
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    Route21 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: agree with someone doing something?

    Hi Heidi

    As a NES, but not a teacher, I would have no problem with the wording written in bold, however, I would have probably replaced "will agree" with "would agree"., after "I don't think....". That having been said, you would probably hear "will" used even in normal NES conversation in this context.

    Regards
    R21

  3. #3
    Heidi is offline Member
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    Default Re: agree with someone doing something?

    Thank you, Route21.

    How about 'I don't think your father would agree with your spending money like that'? Do you think it's correct or natural to your ears?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: agree with someone doing something?

    You may well hear a NES say:

    "I don't think your father would agree with your spending money like that", but I'm not sure that it is strictly grammatically correct - perhaps one of the teachers on the forum could advise.

    Personally, I could rationalise it by considering it in terms of a contraction of something like: ".. your [habit of] spending money like that".

    Hope this helps
    R21

  5. #5
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: agree with someone doing something?

    Quote Originally Posted by Heidi View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you please tell me if this pattern- agree with someone doing something- correct? For example, do we say 'I don't think your father will agree with you spending money like that.?

    Thank you!
    I wouldn't use "with". A better choice is "to", in my opinion.
    "I don't think your father will agree to your spending money like that."
    You can use 'you' or 'your'.

    I detect a difference between:
    1. "You father won't agree with your decision to spend that money."
    2. "You father won't agree to your decision to spend that money."
    The first means he has a different opinion of the wisdom of spending the money. The second means he is likely to veto your decision.

  6. #6
    Heidi is offline Member
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    Default Re: agree with someone doing something?

    Thank you, Raymott. And thank you, Route21.

    After looking it up in dictionaries, I've finally got (I guess) what Raymott meant.(Is this sentence's tense correct?)

    'Agree' in #1 means 'to have the same opinion as someone else', in #2, it means 'to say yes'. Do you agree with me, Raymott?
    Last edited by Heidi; 23-May-2011 at 03:21.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: agree with someone doing something?

    Quote Originally Posted by Heidi View Post
    Thank you, Raymott. And thank you, Route21.

    After looking it up in dictionaries, I've finally got (I guess) what Raymott meant.(Is this sentence's tense correct?)

    'Agree' in #1 means 'to have the same opinion as someone else', in #2, it means 'to say yes'. Do you agree with me, Raymott?
    Yes, I do.

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