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  1. #1
    crazYgeeK is offline Member
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    Default 4 euros change / 4 euro change?

    I have learnt many phrases with the same formation rule such as 4 - age child, 70 - storey building, 2 window house ... But I have recently found this sentence (written as a standard English sentence such as in an English test) "She gave me four euros change". I'm not sure if it should be "four euro" intead maybe for I'm not sure about the role of the word "change" in this case!
    Could you please give me a clear confirmation?
    Thank you so much!

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: 4 euros change / 4 euro change?

    Quote Originally Posted by crazYgeeK View Post
    "She gave me four euros change". I'm not sure if it should be "four euro" intead maybe for I'm not sure about the role of the word "change" in this case!
    Could you please give me a clear confirmation?
    Thank you so much!
    'She gave me four euros/dollars/pounds/etc' change is fine.

    I bought a four-euro ticket. I gave the clerk ten euros (or: a ten-euro note), and she gave me four euros change.

    Some people would not use the hyphens where I have.

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: 4 euros change / 4 euro change?

    Quote Originally Posted by crazYgeeK View Post
    I have learnt many phrases with the same formation rule such as 4 - age child*, 70 - storey building, 2 window house ... But I have recently found this sentence (written as a standard English sentence such as in an English test) "She gave me four euros change". I'm not sure if it should be "four euro" intead maybe for I'm not sure about the role of the word "change" in this case!
    Could you please give me a clear confirmation?
    Thank you so much!
    The phrase 'four dollars' change' means 'change of four dollars' or 'four dollars [in] [ex]change'; so I would say 'four euros' change' (or , if you're not happy about the apostrophe, 'four dollars [in] change'). However, we don't use euros in the UK; the only English-speaking country in the Euro-zone is Ireland - and I've heard Irish people saying 'four euro change'.

    In the UK, we would say, for example, ' a four euro debt', but 'change' is different. (As I said though, habits in Ireland are different. I don't think either could be said to be 'wrong'.)

    b

    PS *What's this? Your general understanding is right, but the expression is 'four-year-old child'

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