Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. Frank Antonson's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,151
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    "...like you need a ride..."

    I was paying little attention to a movie that my wife was watching, but then I heard and noticed an example of what I think is called zeugma.

    A character was saying to a hitchhiker that she and her husband had picked up that "You look like...(and the viewers expected "our son"). But, instead, she said "You look like (after a pause) you need a ride".

    How to diagram the second choice?

    Any ideas? Treat is as "You appear as if you need a ride" vs "You appear as if you were our son"? Does "like" have to be a conjunction vs a preposition here?

    In any case, I found it a clever bit of writing.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 5,315
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: "...like you need a ride..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    I was paying little attention to a movie that my wife was watching, but then I heard and noticed an example of what I think is called zeugma.

    A character was saying to a hitchhiker that she and her husband had picked up that "You look like...(and the viewers expected "our son"). But, instead, she said "You look like (after a pause) you need a ride".

    How to diagram the second choice?

    Any ideas? Treat is as "You appear as if you need a ride" vs "You appear as if you were our son"? Does "like" have to be a conjunction vs a preposition here?

    In any case, I found it a clever bit of writing.

    "You look as if you were sick."

    I learned that "as if" is short for:

    You look as [you would look] if you were sick.

    So "You look as if/like you needed a ride." I guess we're dealing with

    a conjunction.


    James

  2. Frank Antonson's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,151
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: "...like you need a ride..."

    Makes sense.

    I have been away for a while, but I hope to do better.

    Frank

Similar Threads

  1. what is the meaning of "Ride them cowboy"
    By mokbon in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Jan-2011, 13:45
  2. "Ride a train/car..."? In BrE?
    By Mehrgan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-Aug-2010, 11:05
  3. [Vocabulary] How do you pronounce "Cotton", "Button", "Britain", "Manhattan"...
    By Williamyh in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-Dec-2009, 09:36
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Sep-2008, 09:27
  5. confusing words "expressed" or "express" and "named" or"names"
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2007, 20:33

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •