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Thread: slam

  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default slam

    Dear teachers,

    Would you tell me whether I am right with my choice of the suitable interpretation of the word in bold in the following sentence?

    Pakistan slams us over raid that killed bin Laden.

    slam = to criticize harshly, censure forcefully

    V.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: slam

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you tell me whether I am right with my choice of the suitable interpretation of the word in bold in the following sentence?

    Pakistan slams US over raid that killed bin Laden.
    They didn't slam us; the slammed the US.

    slam = to criticize harshly, censure forcefully

    V.
    No, that is the usual, original, figurative meaning of 'slam'.
    Today's newspapers use it to mean "criticise mildly" or "express disapproval" in the slightest amount.

    TV Contestant: I thought the judges could have been a bit nicer to me.
    Newspapers: Contestant slams judges!

  3. #3
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: slam

    Hi Raymott,

    Thanks for your amendments of my original post.

    V.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: slam

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    No, that is the usual, original, figurative meaning of 'slam'.
    Today's newspapers use it to mean "criticise mildly" or "express disapproval" in the slightest amount.

    TV Contestant: I thought the judges could have been a bit nicer to me.
    Newspapers: Contestant slams judges!

    In the original example, and generally speaking, I think that slam is used to mean harshly criticized or strongly criticized. Perhaps others will comment.

    Not a teacher.
    Last edited by SanMar; 26-May-2011 at 07:41. Reason: more info

  5. #5
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    Default Re: slam

    TV Contestant: I thought the judges could have been a bit nicer to me.
    Newspapers: Contestant slams judges

    In my opiniom..
    The above is an example of tabloid journalism, or misinformation which is increasingly becoming part of regular journalism but I digress..

    Not a teacher.


  6. #6
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: slam

    Quote Originally Posted by SanMar View Post
    TV Contestant: I thought the judges could have been a bit nicer to me.
    Newspapers: Contestant slams judges

    In my opiniom..
    The above is an example of tabloid journalism, or misinformation which is increasingly becoming part of regular journalism but I digress..

    Not a teacher.

    Yes you are right. 'Slam' does mean 'criticise harshly', but from my experience, it's only newspapers that use the term, and most use it to mean any criticism at all.

    I believe the literal use comes from wrestling, where a 'body slam' is picking up your opponent horizontally above your head, and propelling him with some force back first onto the floor of the ring. You can also slam someone into a wall.

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