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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    rushing a few frats?

    By "rushing a few frats", do you mean "you are encouraging others to join fraternity clubs" or "they are doing you"? What does it mean?

    -ghost whisperer
    girlfriend- So, how's college life?
    boyfriend-
    You know. I've got a pretty heavy course load, plus i'm rushing a few frats,

    • Member Info
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      • English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: rushing a few frats?

    Not exactly,

    When a university student wants to join a fraternity we say
    he is 'rushing a frat.'

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    #3

    Re: rushing a few frats?

    You learn things in here. A fat Russian, rushing a frat.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: rushing a few frats?

    "Rush" is the period when (usually new) college students get to know the fraternities and sororities on campus. At the end of this period, students may get "bids" to join these organizations. If you accept your bid, you become a "pledge." At the end of your pledging period, you are "initiated" and then you are a "brother" or "sister" of that fraternity or sorority, which is also called a "house."

    It can be a verb. I'm rushing a few fraternities -- I'm interested in learning more about them and maybe becoming a member. It works both ways: The fraternity can say "We're rushing Alan and Richard pretty hard because we think they'd be great brothers for our house."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: rushing a few frats?

    We don''t have fraternities and sorities in the same way in the UK, but a similar-looking word, in the context of university societies, is a 'crush'. A crush is a sort of 'meet-and-greet the freshers' party, with drinks (and standing-room only). (This is very informal, and used only in this context.)

    b

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