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  1. #1
    Ashiuhto is offline Senior Member
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    sits in front of TV

    I don't know how to combine the following sentences into one.

    (1) He often sits in front of TV.
    (2) He often watches TV.

    (a) He often sits in front of TV watching TV.
    (b) He often sits in front of TV to watch TV.

    Which of the above sentence is acceptable, (a) or (b) ?

  2. #2
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    SanMar is offline Senior Member
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    Re: sits in front of TV

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashiuhto View Post
    I don't know how to combine the following sentences into one.

    (1) He often sits in front of TV.
    (2) He often watches TV.

    (a) He often sits in front of TV watching TV.
    (b) He often sits in front of TV to watch TV.

    Which of the above sentence is acceptable, (a) or (b) ?
    In my opinion, neither sentence really sounds correct. As a native speaker I would never say that. When you say that someone is sitting in front of the TV it is strongly communicated, a given, that he or she is watching TV. To me it sounds like you are saying the same thing twice in one sentence.

    Put another way, where else could you sit to watch TV if not in front of it?

    I'm curious, why do you want to join these sentences?

    I am not a teacher so it may be best to wait until a teacher can comment as well.

    Last edited by SanMar; 29-May-2011 at 05:50. Reason: typo

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Re: sits in front of TV

    I agree with SanMar.

    Why do you want to join them, Ashiuhto?

    Rover

  4. #4
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    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: sits in front of TV

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashiuhto View Post
    I don't know how to combine the following sentences into one.

    (1) He often sits in front of the TV. OK, with the amendment.
    (2) He often watches TV. Fine.

    (a) He often sits in front of TV watching TV. No.
    (b) He often sits in front of TV to watch TV. No.

    Which of the above sentence is acceptable, (a) or (b) ?
    As the others have said, it would be a rather strange thing to sit in front of the TV if the TV were not switched on.

    We sometimes use "sit in front of the TV" to suggest a waste of time.

    - What did you do last night?
    - Oh, I just sat in front of the TV for six hours!

    You don't need to add that you were actually watching the TV. I don't think anyone would assume that you simply sat opposite your TV for six hours without watching anything.

  5. #5
    Ashiuhto is offline Senior Member
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    Re: sits in front of TV

    I was misled by the Chinese semantic, so I tried to combine the 2 sentences into one. Now, I know the 2 sentences are mutually exclusive. Another teacher revise the original sentences as written.


    He either sits in front of the TV or chats on the Internet.
    Last edited by Ashiuhto; 30-May-2011 at 04:20. Reason: revise

  6. #6
    sarah GREEK is offline Newbie
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    Smile Re: sits in front of TV

    hi,i am not a teacher,but i am a native speaker.i can uderstand you.I do the same kind of homework when i was in primary school.The two sentence have the same meaning ,but i prefer a
    Quote Originally Posted by Ashiuhto View Post
    I don't know how to combine the following sentences into one.

    (1) He often sits in front of TV.
    (2) He often watches TV.

    (a) He often sits in front of TV watching TV.
    (b) He often sits in front of TV to watch TV.

    Which of the above sentence is acceptable, (a) or (b) ?

  7. #7
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    SanMar is offline Senior Member
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    Re: sits in front of TV

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah GREEK View Post
    hi,i am not a teacher,but i am a native speaker.i can uderstand you.I do the same kind of homework when i was in primary school.The two sentence have the same meaning ,but i prefer a

    I would go so far as to say neither a) or b) would be an acceptable sentence, or one that (most) native speakers would use.

    Just my opinion of course.

    Not a teacher.

  8. #8
    5jj's Avatar
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    Re: sits in front of TV

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah GREEK View Post
    hHi,iI am not a teacher,but i I am a native speaker.iI can understand you.I do did the same kind of homework when i I was in primary school.The two sentences have the same meaning ,but i I prefer (a).
    You are welcome to answer a question if you think you know the correct answer, but please:

    1. Use capital letters where necessary;
    2. Use a space after punctuation marks;
    3. State clearly in your post that you are not teacher.
    4. Do not say in a post that you are a native speaker when you give your native language as Chinese in your profile.

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