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  1. #1
    navi tasan is offline Key Member
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    as/while/because

    1-I cannot call him as he is in the conference room.

    Does this sentence mean two things:
    a-I cannot call him as he WHILE in the conference room.
    b-I cannot call him as he is BECAUSE the conference room.

    The first meaning that would come to my mind is "b" but it seems to me that "a" is possible as well.

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: as/while/because

    I can not call him because he is in the conference room. (That is, he is busy in a conference and does not wish to be disturbed.)

    It is unlikely that a conference room has no phone, or that a person does not have a mobile phone. Now "I can't call him as he is on an airplane" would mean that he can't be reached strictly because of where he is.

  3. #3
    navi tasan is offline Key Member
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    Re: as/while/because

    Thanks Dave.

    But in all cases you have taken "as" to mean "because" and not "while". I guess the two meanings overlap so much that one cannot distinguish between them.

    Consider these sentences:

    A-Don't talk to him as he is driving.=Don't talk to him while he is driving.
    B-Don't talk to him as he is behind the wheel.=Don't talk to him while he is behind the wheel.

    Would you consider "B" correct?It does sound a bit strange to me.

  4. #4
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: as/while/because

    It is correct, but you are just using the expression "behind the wheel" to replace "driving." The meaning is the same. It's not his physical location that prevents him from using the phone. It is the activity he is doing.

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